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Looking beyond the state

Service (as demonstrated by my Chapter Four with Harshad Topiwala on Kenya), as well as the relationships forged externally with other agencies, for example with local missionary groups ( Chapters Two , Three and Eight by Yolana Pringle, Markku Hokkanen and Michael Jennings, respectively), private firms ( Chapter Six , Matthew Heaton), or other (non-medical) research agencies ( Chapter Seven

in Beyond the state
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Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

-to-day basis, assisting and offering advice even when it was not necessarily in the mission’s or government’s best interests. These activities brought together mission and government doctors as professional colleagues and ‘experts’, and in turn shaped what both ‘missionary medicine’ and ‘colonial medicine’ could offer to patients. This chapter examines the practicalities of the

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts

generally in ‘the best position to undertake gland palpitation and puncture’. 57 The use of medical missionaries was all the more expedient, given that missionary doctors were believed to be more trusted than those in the employment of the government, at least by those in mission communities. By 1910, George Prentice of the Livingstonia Mission had become a vocal critic of

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

affecting the Ganda was entirely the product of Mulago-based research. Initially, as Michael Worboys has shown, malnutrition attracted the attention of colonial medical departments between the wars only due to the realisation that improved African diets would increase the value of ‘the native as an economic factor’. 45 In Uganda the growing emphasis on preventive medicine during the 1930s

in Beyond the state
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deals with ‘Race’ in most detail. He finds ‘the race issue is too complicated to be dealt with at best-seller, black-and-white level’, especially after his time in England. He worries that such ‘stories of oppression and humiliation’ with their mandatory ‘clear oppressors and clear oppressed’ may pander to an audience’s ‘sadistic pleasure’, its ‘vicarious sense of power’. He

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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’ were supported, and the assimilation of all difference was demanded. Throughout, it had an unfailing belief and confidence in knowing best. Canada was to become a nation through conformity to a grand narrative, the contents of which were to be based upon British democracy and constitutional monarchy, the Christian myths and saintly symbols of the British Isles, and economic and cultural ‘progress

in Female imperialism and national identity

Seventeenth Centuries , Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1964, remains the best account of the impact of the new ethnology. 11 Andrew Hadfield, Literature, Travel, and Colonial Writing in the English Renaissance , Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1998

in The other empire
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. The best of these appeared in Household Words and All The Year Round , both of which were edited by Dickens. Among them were ‘A walk in the workhouse’, ‘A December vision’, and ‘On duty with Inspector Field’, which exposed the inhumanities of a system that condemned the poor (see Michael Slater (ed.), The Dent Uniform Edition of Dickens’ Journalism , 3 vols, London

in The other empire
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below upward and the object against which the subject is measuring himself undergoes constant change. He loves the object because he would like to resemble it; he hates the object because his chances of resembling it are remote, slight. 36 Being-there, existing in-and for-yourself were not possible at the best

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

largely middle class, and Brathwaite was sent to the island’s best school, Harrison College, where he received a rigorous education modelled on that of an English public school. 13 Early, however, he showed independent tastes. He formed a passion for jazz, music that the island ‘culture censors’ considered low and unsuited to a Harrison College boy. When, in the sixth form, he

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain