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Looking beyond the state

establishment created the preconditions to make them a formal part of the Tanganyikan health sector. In an academic climate that always seems hungry to measure the ‘impact’ of studying history on the understanding of modern issues, Jennings’s final conclusions are especially welcome. He persuasively argues that the modern ‘encroachment of NGOs into the public space from the 1980s was, then, not something new

in Beyond the state
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

Their Ills: Colonial Power and African Illness , Cambridge, Polity Press, 1991; John Iliffe, East African Doctors: a History of the Modern Profession , Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998; Anna Crozier, Practising Colonial Medicine: the Colonial Medical Service in East Africa , London, I.B. Tauris, 2007

in Beyond the state
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Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

John Iliffe, East African Doctors: A History of the Modern Profession , Kampala, Fountain Publishers, 2002 5 Anna Crozier, Practising Colonial Medicine: The Colonial Medical Service in British East Africa , New York, I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd, 2007, pp. 60

in Beyond the state

Dempster & Company, which held a virtual monopoly over the carrying trade between the UK and its West African colonies for more or less the entirety of Nigeria’s colonial history. This chapter examines the relationship between Elder Dempster and the medical and governmental authorities within the British Empire. I argue here that this relationship represents an example of the importance of public

in Beyond the state

points in the history of the ZMA and highlight the progressively acrimonious relations that developed between the Association and the Colonial Medical Service and peaked during the 1930s. In 1925 the Mwembeladu Maternity Home was opened as the institutional base for maternal welfare work. The home, ‘built largely from funds provided by the Tharia Topan family’, 23 was also substantially funded (30

in Beyond the state
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

administration, also employing ancient and modern tropes, corrected her assumption that the Haya had already entered the brave new world which was proving so difficult for the post-war government at home to create. Combining conservative scepticism about the character-weakening effect of welfare with long-established racial preconceptions, officials reminded Huxley that one of William Beveridge’s five giants

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts

prominent. While this overview is generally accurate, it over-simplifies the reality that witnessed a long history of many connections, relations and exchanges between government and mission medicine. This chapter seeks to explore these relations and interactions in order to illustrate the formal and informal forms of cooperation, contestation and conflict. Despite many differences, colonial and missionary

in Beyond the state
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Visions of history, visions of Britain

C. L. R. James had intended in late 1938 to travel from his London base to the United States. His plan was to work with the Trotskyist movement there, but to return to England in time for the 1939 cricket season. We may well speculate that, in fact, his American sojourn would have extended for far longer than he envisaged, had world history not intervened. Neville Chamberlain

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Victorians’ ideological work. The royal tour of empire – the subject of this book – remains an essential function of the British monarchy, embraced by the modern Elizabethan monarchy even long after the end of empire. Queen Elizabeth II is far and away the most travelled monarch in history, having visited every country in the Commonwealth save Cameroon, a total of nearly 200 visits. 2

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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wonder, therefore, that the dislocation and alienation identified with the modern condition were first and most acutely experienced in the plantation regimes of the New World, and that the search for reconciliation between what DuBois termed the ‘two warring souls within one black body’ 41 would be first perceived by those intellectuals who had emerged from that history. Indeed, as Paul Gilroy argues of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain