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Analysing the example of data territorialisation
Andreas Baur-Ahrens

infrastructure. Furthermore, if the functioning of the Internet infrastructure does not appear as self-organising, but as steerable or even with a normative responsibility to steer (in order to secure data from foreign actors), new possibilities for more and more far-reaching regulation are opened up. Government interference within the telecommunications sector becomes more common and can be legitimised

in Security/ Mobility
Helene Brembeck

webpages and marketing campaigns, and annual reports and newsletters from Self-Storage Sweden and other European and US organizations. Most important, the basis of this chapter consists of fieldwork at Humlan – a local self-storage facility in Gothenburg.1 I visited Humlan, spent time with staff now and then for a few weeks, learned all I could about the business, and interviewed the manager, the founder, and the present owner. I also studied their webpage, information leaflets, and everything I could find about Humlan on the Internet. This material has been subjected to

in Overwhelmed by overflows?
Open Access (free)
Another time
Kinneret Lahad

categories, one can explore numerous internet sites, personal blogs, and local initiatives which seek to debunk common understandings and stereotypical attitudes towards single people. One example, an American website called Unmarried America, has earmarked a week in September as the “National Unmarried and Single Americans Week” in the US (Unmarried America 2015). Likewise, since around the early 2000s, self-help books have been available, such as The Single Girl’s Manifesta: Living in a Stupendously Superior Single State of Mind (Stewart 2005), Living Alone and Loving It

in A table for one
Kinneret Lahad

very much limited by conventional sociotemporal regulations. While getting married at seventeen—or twenty-one for that matter—to a first or second boyfriend has come to signify a premature social move (at this age, one has all the time in the world, and living in a meantime or liminal mode is encouraged), a few years later single women must bear the social responsibility for ignoring their ticking biological clocks. Consider, for example, the stereotype of the choosy or selective single woman (Lahad, 2013). While in the earlier stages of singlehood her self

in A table for one
Tony Fitzpatrick

that with the integration and comparison of computer files, we each have an electronic shadow or doppelganger, a ‘data-self’ (Lacy, 1996: 162–3; Fisher, 1997: 120). Sometimes this virtual self is nothing more than a cyberreflection of the real person; increasingly though, the flesh and blood person is being treated as an inferior version of their data-shadow, as in the case of a credit check or a CCTV scan. It all depends upon whether we possess our data-selves or are possessed by them. So, somebody does not have to be logged into the Internet to become massless: in

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

woman in her “prime years,” who has not entered matrimony and is yet to embrace the familial way of life. And so, otherwise banal questions have become the anchor for popular romantic 2 A TABLE FOR ONE comedies, matchmaking reality shows, catchy newspaper article headlines, and the titles of bestselling self-help books worldwide. Scholars and social commentators have extensively analyzed the growing population of single women worldwide, in an attempt both to understand the phenomenon and to propose alternatives to the popular portrayal of female singlehood. In

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Becoming an “old maid”
Kinneret Lahad

singlehood and the categorization of the “aging single woman.” This is why this chapter proposes an analysis of the aging process of single women as a socially situated symbolic practice and not—as it is customarily grasped—as a given biological category. Age and singlehood In her analysis of single women in popular culture, Anthea Taylor (2012) proposes that the study of single women opens a window on how heteronormative and patriarchal frameworks operate in new and sophisticated ways. Inspired by Taylor’s study, I contend that current categorizations of the “old maid

in A table for one
Barbara Czarniawska

9 Virtual red tape, or digital v. paper bureaucracy Barbara Czarniawska Our everyday Camusian-existential struggle […] is played ‘as if’ it were unfolding within a labyrinth-like bureaucracy, as we wrestle with the increasing complexity of contemporary life, with its spider’s web of rules and regulations, some often contradicting the others. (Warner, 2007: 1028) Framing technology has changed: what about overflows? Before I move to the main topic of my chapter, ‘virtual red tape’ as a new way of framing bureaucratic overflows, a few words about bureaucracy. Max

in Overwhelmed by overflows?
Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of research with the ‘far right’
Hilary Pilkington

Garifzianova, 2010; di Nunzio and Toscano, 2014). One way of managing close-up research with distasteful groups has been for researchers to distance themselves from those researched either through the adoption of theoretical frameworks that pathologise those studied or of research techniques – through the use of autobiographies, self-complete questionnaires or analysis of secondary material – that keep researchers’ hands clean (Esseveld and Eyerman, 1992: 218). In studies of the far right this has been accomplished most recently through studies of how such groups use the

in Loud and proud
Open Access (free)
From wasted time to damaged goods
Kinneret Lahad

5 On commodification: from wasted time to damaged goods A few years ago, Princeton alumna Susan Patton (2013), sparked intense debate when, in an open letter to The Daily Princetonian (Princeton’s university student journal), she suggested that female students make the best use of their time at the university by finding a future husband. The only good men out there, she explained, were to be found exclusively in their undergraduate classes. In a follow-up interview with the Daily Mail, Patton added that college-age women “have to start putting in place plans

in A table for one