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Isadora Duncan’s danced revolution
Dana Mills

founded a school for working-​class children in Germany in 1915, and after the revolution in Russia she unsurprisingly moved there in 1921, where she felt she could bring her political and aesthetic vision to fruition. Her understanding of class politics was inseparable from her interpretation of other forms of oppression, and those different categories become intermingled in her interpretation of dance. She was a radical on more than one plane.1 She returned to the West in 1925, and after a tour of Germany she settled in Paris. She died in Nice on 14 September 1927

in Dance and politics
Robert Giddings

survival of ‘corporate management’ is judged as more important than satisfaction of individual conscience. This theme was very strongly represented in Wouk’s stage play, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial (1954), on which the film version of the same year, with Bogart as Queeg, was based. The massive nation state of Soviet Russia was believed to pose an active threat to the western world. Russia had, of course

in British cinema of the 1950s
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

’s journal), the recently crowned Tsar of Russia, wearing plain country dress and walking respectfully alongside his wife’s grandmother. Nikolai had married Victoria’s granddaughter, Alix, Princess Alexandra of Hesse-Darmstadt, in 1894, the same year that his father Alexander III died, but was not crowned Tsar until 1896. Downey and Paul were both quick to advertise that they had ‘exhibited before Her

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

Kuznick saw as engraved within the nation’s public memory. Their treatise about these roots of empire was summarised in two programmes that were prepared, but which ultimately failed to make the final ten-​part package. In the first of these programmes, titled World War One: The Russian Revolution and Woodrow Wilson, government is projected as repeatedly supporting the interests of major American financiers and corporations through military intervention overseas. The chapter charts American expansionist policy under President William McKinley and his successors in the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Paul Henley

work was supported by both the Berlin Museum for Ethnology and the Imperial Academy of Sciences in Vienna. Just as Spencer had done, Pöch sought the advice of Haddon before taking a moving image camera, first to Papua New Guinea in 1904–06 and then to southern Africa in 1907–09. Less well-known is the film material that he shot in 1915, during the First World War, when he was unable to travel abroad. This consists of a series of sequences of dances and traditional crafts performed by Russian soldiers from Central Asia detained in German or Austrian prisoner

in Beyond observation
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

in acting on his monarch’s wishes, Lord Palmerston is shown actively opposing them in Victoria the Great . The royal couple are unhappy with Palmerston’s reckless, warlike attitude towards the United States. Only Albert’s intervention saves the day. In Sixty Glorious Years Palmerston is again shown promoting conflict, this time with Russia, conflict the royal pair believe unnecessary. In this

in The British monarchy on screen
James Downs

Tatars as he galloped across Siberia with a vital message for the Russian Tsar. A French-language version was also made, and when RKO offered Wohlbrück a contract to come to Hollywood and make an English version, he saw an opportunity to leave Nazi Germany behind. He slipped out of Berlin just as the Olympic Games began in August 1936, and sailed for America in the early autumn, arriving in Hollywood in

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

mediatised representations of political power that make this power consumable. MODERN SOVEREIGNTY The cinematic re-enactment of Elizabeth I in the context of 1930s geopolitics coincides with a general interest in charismatic queens. In 1933, Greta Garbo appeared in Rouben Mamoulian’s Queen Christina . The following year Flora Robson played the Empress Elizabeth of Russia alongside

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

years. The book was originally to be called ‘Orlando: Vita’; though styled as a ‘biography’, Victoria Glendinning’s description of Orlando as ‘a phantasmagoria of Vita’s life spread over several centuries’ is more accurate. 26 Specific characters are indebted to real-life individuals: Sasha, the Russian princess, is Violet Trefusis, another of Sackville-West’s lovers; the transvestite

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Sharing anthropology
Paul Henley

ciné-trance. The fact that he refers to this trance-like state not just as a trance, but as a ciné -trance is a sign of the influence of the Polish-Russian Soviet film-maker, Dziga Vertov. Along with Flaherty, Rouch considered Vertov as his filmic ‘totemic ancestor’, claiming that everything that he himself had tried to do as a film-maker could be traced to these two predecessors. 30 Best known for his 1929 film The Man with the Movie Camera , Vertov's work was an enthusiasm that Rouch first took up around the time

in Beyond observation