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The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Birgit Lang

oeuvre, partly in an attempt to curb the idealising tendencies of the German reading public. The differing biographical and artistic studies reproduce what Christian von Zimmermann has identified as the two main biographical narratives characteristic of modernity, namely anthro­ pologisation and idealisation, that is, either an attempt to underline similarities between exceptional and average human beings, or an admiring elevation of biographical subjects that emphasises their status as exceptional individuals.2 As discussed in Chapter 1, in the instance of ∙ 55 ∙ A

in A history of the case study
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Mirrors of French ideals?
Alison Forrestal

Lemarie praised the devotion of the bishop of Saint-Malo, Guillaume Le Gouverneur, to Borromeo and hailed his defence of ecclesiastical privileges in the hope of spurring him to still greater efforts.46 So too had Ambrose and Thomas of Canterbury conserved the spiritual jurisdiction of the church with constant vigilance; like them, all bishops should know that, in fulfilling the demands of their vocation, they might face suffering, torture and, ultimately, a horrific death. Their office was ‘a true apprenticeship of martyrdom’, which might bring, at any moment, ‘the

in Fathers, pastors and kings
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Literary satire and Oskar Panizza’s Psichopatia criminalis (1898)
Birgit Lang

drawn to the theme of political repression in Psichopatia criminalis, without necessarily being able to reflect on the link between their attraction and Panizza’s perceived victimisation. For other readers, Panizza’s late literary oeuvre in particular seems tainted by the fact that the eccentric writer was committed to a mental asylum, never to leave the confines of the asylum again. These readers remain haunted by Panizza’s psychotic illness, which seems to call into question his literary abilities. Literary scholar Michael ∙ 90 ∙ LITERARY SATIRE AND OSKAR PANIZZA

in A history of the case study
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French clerical reformers and episcopal status
Alison Forrestal

bishop and a priest: both would have the power of eucharistic consecration, while the bishop’s superiority would be just a result of the jurisdictional authority to which his office entitled him. Olier’s view followed the later doctrine of Thomas Aquinas which proposed a distinction of order as well as of jurisdiction between priesthood and episcopate, while maintaining their sacramental unity. Of course, Aquinas was not the definitive voice of authority within the Catholic church; it was far more important that the Council of Trent had adopted just this view in its

in Fathers, pastors and kings
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Sovereignty and registration of the laws
John J. Hurt

Maupeou a half century later. When so confronted, the parlements, especially the Parlement of Paris, obfuscated as in the past and touted their devotion to the unqualified sovereignty of the king; but an eighteenth-century president in the Parlement of Aix confessed privately that modification alone ‘totally’ undermined royal sovereignty and placed the king ‘beneath the magistrate’.32 Thomas Hobbes would have agreed. Living in France from 1640 to 1651, the great English thinker both witnessed much of the Fronde and wrote his treatise Leviathan (1651) during his stay. In

in Louis XIV and the parlements
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

, they are valuable sources which can be used to study aspects of noblewomen and power in twelfth-century society, although such a project has its own methodological difficulties. Indeed, Jocelyn WoganBrowne discussed three female-authored twelfth-century Vitae and showed the specific problems inherent in recovering women’s experience from hagiographic sources.36 The twelfth-century Vita of Christina of Markyate has been studied for its value as a source for twelfthcentury female religious.37 Thomas Head, however, analysed the Life in terms of the socio

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Birgit Lang, Joy Damousi and Alison Lewis

psychoanalytic circles owed much to the identification of psychoanalysts with creative artists. Sigmund Freud himself considered these tendencies in the German readership by developing a new case modality, the dialogic-psychoanalytic case study, which considered fragments of the life and oeuvre of creative minds. The impetus for Freud’s variant of the case study was partly his wish to avoid causing offence to his middle-class readership. Psychoanalysis was conceptualised as a life science; like literature, psycho­ analysis was considered to stand astride the presumed divide

in A history of the case study
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Disability in working-class coalfields literature
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin and Steven Thompson

being pushed to the brink of mortality). Individual impairment in this novel rarely demands the explicit explanation or narrative that Mitchell and Snyder argue is usually required of disability (though part of the plot is driven by the slow decline of Alf ’s girlfriend due to tuberculosis). Rather, disability here is collective: most of the figures we see are impaired in some way, and the causes – industry and poverty – are everywhere evident. Here, as elsewhere in Thomas’s acerbic oeuvre, poverty and disability are mutually reinforcing. In this sense, Thomas

in Disability in industrial Britain
Alison Lewis

, the Weimar Republic, National Socialism, exile in France and the USA, as well as the post-war Federal Republic of Germany. It remains something of a mystery, therefore, that Döblin, although critically acclaimed as a writer of international stature, never achieved the popularity of other writers in the modernist canon, most of whom who were just as difficult and complex.7 In the Weimar Republic, Döblin was certainly a prominent figure through his short stories, his journalistic writings and his many novels – in 1925 Thomas Mann already described him as ‘one of our

in A history of the case study