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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

a contemptuous buzzword for the kind of cheap, imitative fictions – gothic romances in particular – that, in the minds of critics, threatened to reduce authorship to mere hack-work. 12 As one of Lane's bestselling female authors, Roche often suffered from the blanket condemnation of Minerva Press publications as cultural trash. Fellow Minerva authors, including the Irish writers Captain Thomas Ashe (1770–1835), Eaton Stannard Barrett (1786–1820), Nugent Bell ( fl. 1817), Alice Margaret Ennis ( fl. 1817), Alicia Le Fanu

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

almost essential to the genre’. 8 Yet, closer examination of Radcliffe's oeuvre reveals that even she was not as attached to Catholic Continental settings as we now tend to think. In fact, Radcliffe's earliest novel The castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (1789) shuns a medieval Catholic European setting in favour of the sublime scenery of contemporary Scotland. If this gestures towards the equation of the so-called ‘Celtic Fringe’ with a barbarity equally terrifying, if not more so, than that of the Catholic Continent, it also refers back to the local, English

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

’s] work in his shocking novel’. 36 Much like the establishment of the binary to which Clery points, male-written Gothics are often viewed as creating and establishing models for incest that are used to shore up the bifurcation of the genre into the Male Gothic and a Female Gothic counter. It is essential to recognise that The Monk was written within the context of Radcliffe’s established oeuvre in

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

Gothic novel’ and ‘Irish Gothic’, as already discussed in this introduction, the tale further interrogates the usual chronological parameters of these bodies of literature and proposes a much earlier, more vital Irish gothic literary production than is usually recognised. By drawing attention to the eighteenth-century Irish writers and texts sometimes included in lists of Irish gothic texts but rarely afforded sustained critical attention, ‘Conjugal fidelity’ traces the limitations of current scholarly definitions and delimitations. 39 Thomas Leland's Longsword

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829