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Transnational dynamics in post-genocidal restitutions

Taking its starting point from a socio-anthropological study combining biographical interviews, semi-structured interviews and ethnographic observations collected between 2016 and 2018 in Germany, France and the United States among Ovaherero and Nama activists, and also members of different institutions and associations, this article focuses on the question of human remains in the current struggle for recognition and reparation of the genocide of the Ovaherero and Nama from a transnational perspective. First, the text shows the ways in which the memory of human remains can be considered as a driving force in the struggle of the affected communities. Second, it outlines the main points of mismatches of perspective between descendants of the survivors and the responsible museums during past restitutions of human remains from German anthropological collections. Third, the article more closely examines the resources of Ovaherero in the United States in the struggle for recognition and reparation, the recent discovery of Namibian human remains in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and the questions that it raises.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Archaeology, networks, and the Smithsonian Institution, 1876–79

and curiosity. Such evidence for the popular appeal of archaeology in the United States during the decades following the American Civil War also exposes the chaotic state of ‘professional’ practice in that era. Diverse communities of interest flourished in the American hinterland. Antiquarian entrepreneurs amassed collections and dealt artifacts through extensive networks; local and regional societies pursued fieldwork, published reports, and promoted cultural achievement. Competition between these communities and networks was commonplace. In particular, structures

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
The key role of the Italian antiquarian market in the inception of American Classical art collections during the late-nineteenth century

antiquities in the United States could have caused – and eventually did cause – in Italy. The purpose of this chapter is to describe a particular historical period, which runs from the late 1880s to the first decade of the ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 47 03/12/2019 08:56 48 Communities and knowledge production in archaeology twentieth century, when American collectors and museums began to express interest in purchasing antiquities from the Mediterranean area and particularly from Italy. During this first period, though, the Americans timidly approached the Italian

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
James Breasted’s early scientific network

-trained American Egyptologist, which meant that his career trajectory would be vastly different from European Egyptologists at the time. Second, because Breasted’s career would set the foundations of academic Egyptology within the United States, he knew from the start that it would be necessary to form his scientific network carefully and deliberately. His case therefore allows for the explicit examination of strategic network building. James Breasted, Egyptologist James Henry Breasted was born on the prairies of Illinois in 1865. By the time he was 22, he had shifted careers

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens

5 A romance and a tragedy: Antonín Salač and the French School at Athens Thea De Armond Defined, in culture-historical fashion, as the regions occupied by the ancient Greeks and Romans, the ‘Classical world’ once spanned much of Europe and parts of Asia and Africa.1 The study of the Classical world – in particular, its archaeology – has been somewhat more limited in geographical scope, or rather, its most prominent forebears tend to hail from only a few places, namely Germany, Great Britain, France and, perhaps, the United States of America (see Dyson, 2006

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Clusters of knowledge

Serbian archaeologists overcame epistemological limitations through informal communication and how this has shaped modern Serbian archaeological thought and practice. The following two chapters look at the connections and communications between collectors and institutions. Once again informal and fluid networks are the focus of Snead’s chapter as he discusses antiquarian communities in the United States during the nineteenth century, looking in particular at the cooperation and competition between antiquarian societies, individuals and the nascent national institutions

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
The first Dutch excavation in Italy, 1952–58

turned their back on the ideological and practical remnants of Fascism, and Italian Classical archaeologists (many of whom had served under Fascism) looked for new approaches to avoid the mixing of politics and archaeology. As a result, much emphasis was placed on technical studies that carried no ideological connotations (Barbanera, 1998). From an international perspective, the overall post-war spirit was one of international collaboration, illustrated by the opening moves of European collaboration and the rapprochement with the United States of America that

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology