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Peter J. Spiro

: membership in a polity is a necessary condition for human autonomy and well-being” (p. 40). Defined narrowly as participation in democratic self-government at the level of states, this seems both empirically doubtful and possibly condescending to the many individuals who live self-fulfilled, post-political lives. In the United States, for example, many people have checked themselves out of the political process, and for good reason. The level of

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

citizenship status and voting rights. These are two different questions, the answers to which need not be derived from the same inclusion principle. The distinction is clearly drawn in section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

Rogers M. Smith . Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press : 149–165 . Habermas , Jürgen . 1986 . Between Facts and Norms . Cambridge : MIT Press . Hayduk , Ron . 2005 . Democracy for All: Restoring Immigrant Voting in the United States . New York : Routledge . Hobden , Christine . 2015 . “ States, Citizens, and Global Justice: The Political Channels of

in Democratic inclusion
Catherine Baker

suddenly ascribed ex-Yugoslavs the same status as Africans (i.e. objects of pity and mistrusted visa nationals) on to the figure of the African peacekeeper. In April 1995, negotiating a post-war UN peacekeeping mandate, the Croatian government was forced to deny reports it had insisted on no African or Asian states participating (O'Shea 2005 : 145). Bangladesh, Pakistan, India and Malaysia had been among the larger United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) contributors in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and UNPROFOR's first commander (a public figure) was an Indian

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Frontier patterns old and new
Philip Nanton

marijuana was being replaced in its traditional export markets – the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom – by high-quality Mexican or Moroccan product. The 2000–2001 UNODC report argues that, in real terms, the value of Caribbean marijuana exports had plummeted by 80 per cent since the early 1980s. In the UK, herbal cannabis from the Caribbean was estimated to represent less than 2 per cent of the

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

-first centuries – i.e. the impact and meaning of globalisation? This question, it seems to me, comes even more clearly into focus when the perspective shifts from the relatively better known and more visible anglophone island states of Jamaica or Trinidad and Tobago, to an even more peripheral multi-island Caribbean micro-state, St Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG). Can a country of some 389 km 2 (150 mi 2

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Catherine Baker

in the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) has very recently come into view in scholarship ‘between the posts’ (Chari and Verdery 2009 ) of postsocialism and postcolonialism as an explanation for its ambiguities within global raciality. The autonomous foreign policy and Marxist ideology that Yugoslav Communists sought after the 1948 Tito–Stalin split led Yugoslavia to become a founder member of this self-declared geopolitical third force that emerged from the 1955 Bandung conference of anti-imperialist African and Asian states. Recovering Non-Alignment as a topic of

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Some questions for Rainer Bauböck
Joseph H. Carens

protection of fundamental rights – which, to be fair, is Bauböck's primary concern – we cannot ignore questions about the social and economic conditions that determine what those rights mean in practice. I write at a moment when the Black Lives Matter movement has gained prominence in the United States and, to a lesser degree, in other states as well. This movement reminds us that some people have a daily experience of not enjoying equal protection

in Democratic inclusion
Rousseau’s and nationalism
Mads Qvortrup

state of war’, wrote Rousseau in Du Contrat Social, ‘cannot arise from simple personal relations’ (III: 357). As always fascinated by paradoxes – (‘I would rather be a man of paradoxes than a man of prejudices’, he wrote in Emile (II: 82)) – he noted the tragic irony that states which had been established to avert civil wars Chap004.p65 88 11/09/03, 13:35 A civic profession of faith 89 gave rise to international wars. As he put it in The State of War, ‘we see men united by an artificial concord, assemble to slaughter one another, and all the horrors of war arise

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

politics. 40 Among the consequences, enormously pertinent is the excision of distinct intermeshing(s) of religion and politics in the modern West. 41 Here apprehensions of the interplay between the categorical terrains of religion and politics in, say, the United Kingdom or the United States of America – as part of a reified West – usually rest upon a readily proffered putative

in Subjects of modernity