Search results

Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia

stabilised and immutable knowledge, as against depicting the dynamics of change and history, could have been that the depiction of time has been a neglected topic in geography. While Latour sketches the role of graphic inscriptions in the epistemological groundings of Western science, others have taken different critical positions towards the ontic status of mapping itself. For example, Doreen Massey (2005) describes how space in (Western) cartography became a static representation; cleared from uncertainties and procedural knowledge, human movement and displacement. She

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia

: as Valerie November and her coauthors argue in their unpacking of the new understandings of space produced by digital mapping technologies and practices, ‘no one and no thing ever resided in the virtual image of the map’ (November, Camacho-Hübner, and Latour, 2010: 594). The map, as it has been imagined in the Western scientific tradition, is lifeless; static; denying processes and temporality; cleaving time from space to construct it. As Doreen Massey put it, the map is ‘the sphere of a completed horizontality’ (Massey, 2005: 107). Denis Wood and John Fels take a

in Time for mapping
Considerations and consequences

representations that Mapping the space of flows 183 are mutable and flowing and no longer fixed in time and space as ink on paper is. Writing has become liquid, and digital representations of meaning have begun to pulse and flow at an ever-quickening pace that militates against the pause and traction, ­concentration and reflection that meaning construction and knowledge production demand, and that print culture could facilitate. One is surely justified in wondering whether this emphasis upon the mapping of flows, rather than, or in addition to, routes and static locations

in Time for mapping
A trialogue

from the smell. individual sense rather than a social sense? Yes. Smells are generally regarded as highly individual, especially in Western contexts. We don’t know what each other smells, but we also don’t have a shared vocabulary for communicating smell knowledge, unlike in some other cultures where smell You’ve done smell mapping walks in is  a more intrinsic part of many different countries with many e­ veryday life. different cultural settings, like Singapore, Marseilles, Amsterdam, Pamplona, New York or Ellesmere Port. I know this is very tentative, as your

in Time for mapping

serves as a reminder of how pervasive cartographic reason has been in Western thought and governance (and by extension, in everyday life); that disparate assemblages, cultures and things can be convened and disciplined through geometric abstraction. OSM user ‘Nigel’ sends a text to Ed, he can’t make it today, he is going to the theatre in Yorkshire tonight; a long drive ahead. Participation at such events is always precarious. Ed was preparing an introductory talk on mapping techniques and editing software for his Mensa colleagues and other interested mappers, of which

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

, Weileder’s Atlas reinforces a Proustian emphasis on the ‘slicing’ of time and memory across spatial referents, and that the artist’s ‘constructive’ photographic practice – to use Walter Benjamin’s term – ­suggests that 116 Stitching memories Figure 5.1  Wolfgang Weileder, Gulf of Naples s2912, 2009, from the Seascapes series. Lambda Print, 75 x 154cm © Wolfgang Weileder (courtesy of Wolfgang Weileder). This figure has not been made available under a CC licence. Permission to reproduce it must be sought from the copyright holder. the contemporary capitalist culture

in Time for mapping

, technology acting from without and, on the other, politics and society simply responding from within. The ‘deterritorialised’ forces of finance (Wriston, 1988; Cerny, 1996; McKenzie and Lee, 1991), production and trade (Porter, 1990; Reich, 1991) and culture (Fukuyama, 1992) are cast in opposition to the presumed territorial realities of state and society. States and societies are consistently positioned as passive receivers of technological transformation. We are left with the impression that global restructuring is nothing more than an effect of the ‘global process’ of

in Globalisation contested

at the service of big-power management’ (Cox, 1996: 57). It is in this historical context, of US scholarship in the early 1970s, that IPE was defined in a particular way, reflecting dominant modes of thought and embodying a particular world view. Thus, Stephen Krasner has it that ‘the achievements of international political economy have been generated by an epistemology that conforms with the Western Rationalistic Tradition’ (1996: 122). We may consider early ‘orthodox’ IPE to follow the conventions of rationality and positivist inquiry that were outlined in

in Globalisation contested