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Yulia Karpova

, ‘Novye formy, novye zhanry’, Dekorativnoe Iskusstvo SSSR 1 (1969), 27–9. 78 Smirnov, ‘Krizis? Chego?’, 29. 79 Karateev, ‘Vsesoiuznaia vystavka dekorativnogo iskusstva’, 7. 80 However, there was evidently interaction between design reformers and human rights activists. Two cases are well known. In 1968 Boris Shragin signed petitions in defence of four Moscow intellectuals accused of anti-Soviet propaganda and KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 116 20/01/2020 11:10 Objects of neodecorativism 117 agitation, and thus lost his position at the Research Institute of

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

inmates were relocated to Auschwitz. However the construction of a gas chamber and ovens by camp-commandant Anton Kaindl in March 1943 facilitated the means to kill larger numbers of prisoners. The camp was liberated in April 1945 by Soviet and Polish units of the Red Army, and for the next five years it served as a Soviet Special Camp, soon holding twelve thousand prisoners; in all, sixty thousand were detained over the five years before the camp was disbanded in 1950. The prisoners were mainly German officers, Nazi collaborators and anti-Soviet activists. At least

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

the clear conceptualisation of artistic work in industry proved to be a key question of the post-Stalin aesthetic regime of arts. The philosopher (and future human rights activist) Boris Shragin immediately responded to the Matsa–Gorpenko debate, arguing that aesthetic theory in general tends to fall behind the development of technology and material culture and could not keep up with the rapid changes of recent decades. The result, he argued, was a paradoxical situation: his colleagues could admire machines and practical household objects as human beings, but they

in Comradely objects
Yulia Karpova

Kochugov et al., design programme Vtormar (‘Secondary material resources’), experimental implementation, 1984. From objects to design programmes 153 the approaching perestroika shifted the recycling problem to the margins of the state’s agenda. Ultimately, Vtormar fell into the ranks of the many forgotten visionary projects, such as the Domestic Information Machine. That said, the idea of recycling infrastructure that was integrated yet visually striking may be of use to today’s environmental activists in Russia. Conclusion For Soviet design professionals, the

in Comradely objects