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Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship

touched by the display of loyalty’ from his father’s subjects of colour. 1 In the person of the duke and in the memory of the duke’s grandmother the Great Queen, Peregrino invested in the promise of an inclusive, non-racial imperial citizenship, the rights and responsibilities of which would be shared by all of Britain’s colonial subjects regardless of colour or creed. Born in Accra in Gold Coast

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice

increased local governance in the colonies of settlement and India; and the declining value of an ‘empire of free trade’ in a world where Britain’s unilateral dominance was threatened by the growing political, economic, and military potency of the United States and Germany. In response, imperial stakeholders sought to cement the importance of the empire to British subjects at home and abroad. The

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’

In 1840 the Aborigines’ Protection Society (APS) produced an advice manual for the Colonial Office, a set of model laws for the governance of the ‘Native’ peoples of the Empire. Published by John Murray of London under the title Outline of a System of Legislation for Securing Protection of all Countries Colonized by Great Britain; Extending to Them Political and Social

in Equal subjects, unequal rights

confusion, it also demonstrates the longevity of Queen Victoria as a symbol of British justice and benevolence, the image carefully nurtured by colonial officials and imperial stakeholders of the Queen as the mother of empire. Despite anti-colonial movements of the interwar period and imperial betrayals from the Union of South Africa to the Amritsar Massacre, this image managed to survive, a testament to

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911