Search results

Open Access (free)

divisions between federal subjects. Indeed, the demands for legal separatism and the development of bilateralism can be seen as logical responses to the constitutional inequalities inherent in the system. The foundations of Russia’s constitutional order The manner by which Russia’s constitutional foundations were laid down have also had a major impact on its transition. As we have seen the foundations of Russia’s constitutional order were born out of conflict and coercion rather than dialogue and consensus. And the Constitution was largely imposed from above on a weak

in Federalism and democratisation in Russia
Crafting authoritarian regimes in Russia’s regions and republics

counting in favour of a particular candidate; 7) Outright falsification of counting protocols in cases where all other methods have failed.35 FAD9 10/17/2002 6:03 PM Page 165 Crafting authoritarian regimes 165 Guided elections Governing elites are also not averse to using coercion and/or persuasion to mobilise their citizens to come out and vote for their choice of leaders. The votes of the electorate in these ‘guided’ elections always coincide with the interests of the local elites.36 A first clue to the phenomenon of guided elections is where the electorate

in Federalism and democratisation in Russia

Office initiated a series of interventions, all designed to confirm the government's commitment to tough border controls. The majority of these constituted what we might understand as speech acts. 2 These were public proclamations of intent. At the same time, there was a period during the project when the more overt coercion of immigration raids and people being ‘lifted’ in public places seemed to escalate. In trying to better understand the impact of

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Association and distinction in politics and religion

, government building, or religious monument in a city, the more evident it is to all and the less it can be enjoyed only for the private satisfaction and reassurance of the privileged. But the larger the garden, the greater the likelihood that it will be shielded from public gaze. The small patch of the ordinary subject or citizen can be viewed from the street, from the train, from the bus. The gardens of the wealthy are not mere estates, but landscapes, and functioning for the exclusive identity cultivation of their owners. Denis Cosgrove has argued that that ‘landscape

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)

‘strong eugenics’ of state coercion (cf. Glover, 1999: 104). And although they would permit far more genetic engineering than Shakespeare, Buchanan et al. (2000) come to a similar conclusion: ‘. . . just as the state is the principal agent acting in the interests of future generations in such fields as land and resource management, so too does a eugenic role for the state, if needed, fit into the standard categories of legitimate areas of concern for government’ (Buchanan et al., 2000: 337). All of which is both to agree and disagree with Diane Paul (1998: 94–111) when

in After the new social democracy

of interaction that regulate, organise or monitor human behaviour by integrating it into a pre-arranged environment, built upon a conception of “normality” or “regularity” that all subjects are expected to reproduce’ (Lianos with Douglas, 2000: 264). But if these ‘pre-regulated’ spaces encompass both rich and poor territories, the asymmetries of power between those territories alter the means of reproduction within them (Fitzpatrick, 2001d). In the affluent territories the periphery consists of marginal people who must be both excluded and endlessly reimagined

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic

chapter4 21/12/04 11:00 am Page 73 4 Journeying to death: Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic has received huge international acclaim.1 Within American studies, anthropology, black studies, Caribbean studies, cultural studies and literary studies the book has been hailed as a major and original contribution.Gilroy takes issue with the national boundaries within which these disciplines operate, arguing that, as the book jacket tells us there is a culture that is not specifically African, American, Caribbean, or British, but all

in Postcolonial contraventions

fashion few other political subjects have achieved in the post-Cold War world. 1 Ironically, it is in the limelight not due to its general acceptance but because of its controversial character, which has led to acrimonious debates. At the two ends of the scale there is, on the one hand, rejection, with the notion seen as nonsensical, an ‘oxymoron’, 2 the hallmark of deceit and, on the other, its acceptance as one of the clearest manifestations of altruism, the epitome of

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)

want to concentrate upon the more controversial aspect of the above definition, that of fair distribution. TZP2 4/25/2005 4:50 PM Page 35 Justice and citizenship 35 There are essentially seven theories of justice offering an answer to this question (cf. Barry, 1989, 1995): justice as equality, as reciprocity, as procedure, as virtue, as restoration, as retribution and as differential inclusion. Again, for reasons of space I am not going to deal with all of these but instead concentrate upon those that have dominated the debate during recent years: egalitarian

in After the new social democracy

has too many children in order to manipulate the welfare benefits system (Anderson, 2013 : 7). In her book Revolting Subjects ( 2013 ), Imogen Tyler identifies the affective and embodied dimensions of these characterisations of the modern state as reliant on the production of ‘abject subjects’ such as Travellers, asylum seekers and unemployed youth (2013: 4), who are identified as outsiders, so that others can be considered insiders. Tyler

in Go home?