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Enthusiasm and audit

, and once having seen it to pass it on in the form most appropriate to its transmission. It would be to ignore, also, the novel’s generous and unforbidding circulation of other texts. And above all it would be to ignore the fact that in Ahab what Melville presents is an enthusiast who has become, among other things, a bureaucrat, who uses form and ritual as a mode of coercion, whose relation to things involves constantly converting them into what they are not. Ahab, as generations of commentators have rightly observed, is a proto-dictator, and unquestionably his

in Enthusiast!
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Ezra Pound

the introduction to the Oxford Book of Modem Verse, piling up verbs and nouns to indicate the variousness of his subject. Primarily, though, there are two Pounds here, relating to Yeats’ sense of early and late. It is the later that dominates – Yeats is writing in the mid-1950s amid a torrent of Poundian tracts and pamphlets – and what comes through is a picture of a writer who can neither stem nor order the flow, who presents the behaviour of the ill- educated, a writer who, above all, has lost self-control. Yeats’ image thus supplements Eliot’s, describing the

in Enthusiast!
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Middle English popular romances has been characterised by a thinly – if at all – veiled repugnance to the romances themselves, not only to their poetic form but their subject matter and the medieval audience who is imagined to enjoy them. As Arthur Johnston has demonstrated, it is in the middle of the eighteenth century, with the publication of the first modern editions, that the study of Middle English romance is born; more recent analysis by John Ganim, Nick Groom and David Matthews has exposed the ideologies latent in much of that early work and I build on their

in Pulp fictions of medieval England