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Thinking, feeling, making

grandmother on my mum's side of the family died shortly before I took up my first permanent academic post. She left behind a box of handwritten notes, letters, photographs, birth and death certificates, and a family tree sketched on a large sheet of paper. This document traced the Coles (the maiden name of my great grandmother on my mum's side of the family) back to the 1700s. Only the bare bones of names, dates, and occupations had been recorded, but the listed occupations reveal a history of blacksmiths and other metalworkers on that side of the family, stretching back to

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)

Pontefract, ed. R. Holmes (2 vols, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series, 25, 30, 1899 for 1898, 1902 for 1901), 2. no. 407. 59 Chester Charters, no. 185. In 1145–53 Richard de Curcy, peticione et concessione Alicie uxoris mee, gave to Jordan de Furches lands to hold by service of three-quarters of a knight’s fee; unfortunately the cartulary copy of this charter has an abbreviated witness list, so it is unclear whether Alice witnessed or not: EYC, 4. no. 61. See below, Chapter 6, for discussion of countergifts more generally. 60 ‘Charters relating to the honour

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
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honor; her advice is sought along with the consilium of Hugh’s barons.8 Ermentrude also played a crucial role in the foundation of St Werburgh’s Abbey, Chester. The so-called ‘Great Charter’ of Ranulf II, dated to the early 1150s, reveals that it was Ermentrude who, at the order of her husband, placed the gift of Weston upon Trent on the altar at the public founding ceremony.9 The importance of such public ceremonies was to secure the grant in memory before the use of written records became routine, yet their precise mechanisms are often obscured in charters where

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
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Troubling race, ethnicity, and masculinity in Beowulf

reading and listening, it is anxiety that gathered so many audiences around Beowulf for so long a time. The purpose of this chapter, then, is to probe some of the points in the poem that trouble certain audiences in order to understand the ways in which these communities function emotionally in relation to the text. In particular, I pursue this work of emotional archaeology by tracing anxieties around masculinity, ethnicity, and race that found their expression in Beowulf – and that different audiences have projected on to it, first in Beowulf's sexualized encounter

in Dating Beowulf
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monks of Robertsbridge concerning lands of her maritagium.145 The seal depicts more conventional motifs, the standing figure, fleur-de-lys and staff. The seal of Margaret de Bray is a good example of the way that women’s identities could change according to the female life cycle, and thus shows how seals are a valuable, even if incomplete, record. Margaret was married firstly to Robert the Chamberlain of Dunton, by whom she had two sons and three daughters, who were in the king’s gift in 1185.146 She married as her second husband Roger de Bray (d. ante 1205), and was

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)

feudal nobility. One significant problem which is not resolved in his treatment of the subject is that of the composition of the court. Hugh Farmer, ‘The canonization of St Hugh of Lincoln’, Architectural and Archaeological Society of the County of Lincoln Report and Papers, new ser., 6: 2 (1956), 86–117, brought together papal letters and sworn testimonies made during the canonisation campaign. The role of women as sworn witnesses would be a fruitful line of enquiry for further research into the incidence of specific illnesses and, for 46 patronage and power 44

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Unreadable things in Beowulf

clue, or perhaps Æschere is not a name at all. The narrative context would suggest that it is, or at least it is used as a name when Hrothgar tells Beowulf that ‘Sorh is geniwod /​Denigea leodum:  dead is Æschere, Yrmenlafes yldra broþor’ [Sorrow is renewed for the Danes: Æschere is dead, Yrmenlaf’s older brother] (1322–​4). Yet it is not commonly used as a name elsewhere in Old English. The online Prosopography of Anglo-​Saxon England (PASE) informs us that there is only one Æschere (male) recorded in Domesday Book m xi.5 In the poetry, ‘æschere’ appears not as a

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
A queer history

from London 1942 25 H.D.'s dedication signals her preoccupation with the past, connecting her own experience of the Blitz to her travels undertaken with Bryher nearly twenty years before to the archaeological site of Karnak in Egypt, whose connection to the past informs H.D.'s approach to the present. Nor is this the only dedication to Bryher, who is also featured in the

in Dating Beowulf
Enigmas, agency and assemblage

with a partly supernatural power, it was surely the boon of the whalebone itself that warranted the creation of such a time-​consuming, high-​status artefact. As Vicki Ellen Szabo points out, ‘the material must matter, otherwise its origins would not have merited mention’. One must ‘question whether the material would have merited inscription if it had been something more mundane; the archaeological record offers few such examples’ and so the inscription on the front ‘implies that the material itself is as fantastic as any of the magical iconography 131 The riddles

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Fragility, brokenness and failure

‘we can be invited to walk around a poem only in a metaphorical sense’.26 197 Fragility, brokenness and failure 197 What sort of encounter does the Ruthwell monument offer us, then? How is this experience like or unlike that offered by The Dream in the Vercelli Book? Above all, I understand the Ruthwell monument as a thing of tension and paradox. This view has been borne out by my own personal experience of it but also by an examination of its documented history, the written record of which started with a note made in 1599 when Reginald Bainbrigg visited the

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture