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Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood

(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989). 10 Joseph Fitzgerald, ‘Reminiscence in Adult Development’, in David C. Rubin (ed.) Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), p. 370. 11 Fitzgerald

in Memory and popular film
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Civil rites of passage

‘presentism’, whereby the pressures of the present distort our understanding of the past. 6 Character-led dramas (often based on autobiographical novels, and memoir – like Crisis at Central High , Heart of Dixie, and Passion for Justice: The Hazel Brannon Smith Story ) promote a single monologic point of view to create what has ubiquitously come to be known as a ‘useable past’, in which resolution and

in Memory and popular film
A cinematic response to pessimism

this regard, I read the title of Cavell’s Pursuits of Happiness to be less descriptive than autobiographical. In that book, we discover an author recounting, sharing and partaking in the pursuit of happiness (of going to the movies). Much of my disagreement with Dienstag, then, rests on my inability to recognize his account of Cavell’s motivation in writing about film. I

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
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isolation. In the two years before shooting he had faced widespread media criticism following the release of Natural Born Killers. Further shocked by the disappointing critical and public response to Nixon (1995), he also had ended up in divorce proceedings. As recompense, Stone returned to finish his semi-​autobiographical book, A Child’s Night Dream (1997). Completion of the manuscript brought back a complex mix of emotions and memories about his childhood, his relationship with his father and mother, his experiences in Vietnam, and later in the Merchant Marine Corps

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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properly underway. Gripped with the desire to make his mark as a writer, the trip to Asia provided the raw material for Stone’s first writing project: a semi-​autobiographical novel that lay dormant for many years before being published in the 1990s as A Child’s Night Dream. Figure 1  Lou and Oliver Stone, Hong Kong, February 1968 Wa r The themes of suicide and death reverberate through the pages of this early writing, and it is not hard to see how the American post-​Second World War psychoses of power, responsibility, guilt and redemption dictate much of Stone

in The cinema of Oliver Stone