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evident similarities that underlie the histories related here. Whether the nurses came from a European culture or were recruited from the indigenous population; whether their initial impulses were adventure or patriotism or altruism; whether they saw their work as ‘civilising’ or as ‘health’; whether they worked within or outside of imperial institutions; whether they were afforded autonomy in their work or were closely supervised, they all played vital roles in the delivery of healthcare and the shaping of colonial and post-colonial relations. The authors in this

in Colonial caring

-brokers can, and regularly do, take advantage of this belief to subvert the priorities of developing world governments, national medical professional associations, local communities and millions of families. Too often, countries’ autonomy and authentic independence are the collateral damage of top-down global health. Unfortunately, this happens to a greater or less degree in most global immunisation initiatives, 11 but the most extreme and blatant loss of autonomy

in The politics of vaccination
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Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction

protect their womenfolk.59 Negotiating these sensitive gender boundaries, nurses on active service overseas worked to expand traditional nursing work, developed an autonomy that they had hitherto not known and brokered their place as women in a war zone, ‘the one impregnable male bastion’.60 Personal testimony and the nurses’ war This book uses a range of personal testimony material, including oral history, diaries, letters and memoirs to examine the work of nurses on active service overseas and their place within the Second World War medical services. Although nursing

in Negotiating nursing
The origins and endurance of club regulation

more on smoothing relations between practitioners in order to forestall professional conflict. Percival’s code is notable for introducing the term ‘medical ethics’, but it is perhaps more significant in another respect.16 In order to restrict the power of lay hospital governors, who physicians believed were interfering in running the Manchester Infirmary, Percival’s Medical Ethics stressed the collective autonomy of medical practitioners and the need for ‘collaborative self-regulation’.17 To Percival, ‘medical ethics’ denoted a set of professional, not public

in The making of British bioethics
A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s

in a series of lectures at the University of Edinburgh, which were published in 2002 as Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics. She claimed here that: Although the decades since the beginning of contemporary ­bioethics  have seen a lot of effort to improve the trustworthiness of public institutions and of experts, culminating in the UK in the additional demands for accountability, audit and openness of the 1990s, this is quite compatible with a decline in public trust, and specifically with a decline of public trust in medicine, science and biotechnology.173 O

in The making of British bioethics
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to her soldier patients. She found herself – as a coopted member of the BEF – more or less entrapped within the bounds of her military service. This sense of being confined – of being unable to act with autonomy or determine one’s own fate – seems to have been typical of members of the ‘official’ military nursing services, particularly when on active service overseas.13 As a guest member of the BEF in France, Fitzgerald commented on the restrictions of military service, observing that any individual who joins the army ‘weaves himself or herself into a cocoon of red

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
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books such as Easeful Death, she now claimed that it was ‘inhumane’ to deny people the right to die.8 She argued that this included not only terminally ill patients, but also individuals who felt they were a burden on their families due to disability or old age.9 When it came to assisted dying, Warnock argued, doctors had a pressing duty, ‘unless their religion forbids it’, to respect the autonomy of dying, elderly and disabled patients.10 In a 2008 column for the Observer, she stressed that ‘we have a moral obligation to take other people’s seriously reached

in The making of British bioethics

in, that of supervising doctors, and telling them what to do, quite apart from them being Germans’.33 This reversal of professional order was also described by Sister Mary Sands, a QA who arrived, probably with 32 CCS, soon after the liberation.34 The nursing sisters had significant autonomy in their duties. Sister Kathleen Elvidge wrote home: ‘There is one English doctor to each square of five blocks, so as you can imagine we don’t see much of her. Then we have some Belgian medical students who also help, I’ve got two assigned to my block.’35 The official

in Negotiating nursing

posting, many nursing sisters had some experience of the horror of wounds caused by industrial weaponry. However, as suggested in the quotation above, the exigencies of active service, including the often limited access to medical officers, demanded innovative and rapid nursing responses to the life-­threatening injuries of an increasingly technological war.2 Using surgical nursing in war as a ‘case study’ for developments in nursing practices and professional autonomy, the chapter examines the changes to the domain of their work by nursing sisters on active service

in Negotiating nursing
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Perceiving, describing and modelling child development

regarded as an extension of psychiatric authority, but rather as part of a wider change that has ensured the legal rights of children to express their individuality and autonomy. This book explores the changes that this has effected in our understanding of child development. The growth of the autism category has been accompanied by a belief that there is a biochemical reality in differences in children’s responses to parents and to

in The metamorphosis of autism