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Fiona Robinson

ethicists have been particularly aware not only of the progressive potential of care ethics, but of the very real possibilities for domination that inhere. Thus Joan Tronto has suggested, ‘There is always implicit in care the danger that those who receive care will lose their autonomy and their sense of independence’ (Tronto 1993 : 146). Because care ethicists are concerned to highlight moral (and political

in Recognition and Global Politics
Meanings, Limits, Manifestations
Patrick Hayden and Kate Schick

untenable dualism between private and public autonomy. In essence, Taylor's attempt to ‘correct’ liberal proceduralism by mapping collective rights intended to protect the substantial values of cultural groups onto the formal rights of individual citizens implies the splitting of autonomy into two separate yet somehow internally linked spheres. In the end, Habermas argues, the double-edged aspect of

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

federal arrangement – as one mechanism for managing questions of regional diversity and local autonomy – emerging in the archipelago (Reeve 1996: 151). Survival of and resistance to Dutch colonisers and Japanese invaders, and the final fight for independence against the Dutch forces, became the basis of a powerful legacy and symbolism of respect, even reverence, for the Indonesian nation and nationalism. Mirroring this reverence, however, and growing from the same roots, was a deep unease about the fragility of the Indonesian State and the loyalty of the outer islands

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
Recognition, Vulnerability and the International
Kate Schick

. Nussbaum's call for Socratic examination promotes the interrogation of beliefs, prioritizing rational argument and rational autonomy. The cultivation of global citizenship encourages the accumulation of knowledge of other cultures, languages and histories, knowledge wielded for the purpose of expanding the ‘community of reason’ (Nussbaum 1997 : 63). And narrative imagination

in Recognition and Global Politics
Dominant approaches
M. Anne Brown

models of the state as much as they make claims regarding the integrity and autonomy of individuals. And questions of rights in international relations quickly become matters of whether or not and how to ensure that key elements of this configuration of state and individual – and, to a shifting extent, this model of the state – pertain in all states. This discussion points to the aridity of the ways for conceptualising ethical concerns in international life made available by the dominant accounts, which remain significantly characterised by the see-sawing polarity of

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Emilian Kavalski and Magdalena Zolkos

is the suggestion that human beings acquire social existence intersubjectively and dialogically (Fraser and Honneth 2003 ; McQueen 2011 ). As Hegel himself famously declared in The Phenomenology of Spirit ( 1977 ), recognition entails the achievement of self-consciousness and affirmation of one's autonomy and freedom in relation to others – that is, the emergence of a subject ‘with particular

in Recognition and Global Politics
Brian White

poses a major challenge to foreign policy analysts. State-centricity is further challenged by related processes like interdependence and transnationalism which directly challenge the autonomy of states and their ability to control outcomes (Keohane and Nye 1977 ). Significantly, both state-centric and state-as-actor assumptions have been undermined by what Keohane and Nye refer to as transgovernmentalism. This denotes the

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

socialists and other trade unionists. In the Soviet zone of occupation, the autonomy of these groups was perceived as potentially dangerous to the claims of the Communists to be the ‘leading party’, and they were swiftly disbanded by the Soviet authorities. [See also: fascism] anti-Semitism The term in its literal sense means hostility towards ‘Semites’: people from the Middle East defined

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

this liberal, or simply modern, orientation to life, what balances the particularism of individual autonomy is the universality of our status as individuals. Recognising our common vulnerability and, for most contemporary renderings of this story on the basis of our individual but common autonomy, using the processes of our common reason, we join together in society. This universality may be more substantive, so that we share specific rights (to life, liberty and property) simply because we are all autonomous individuals. Or the nature of universality may be more

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Between international relations and European studies
Ben Tonra and Thomas Christiansen

reflected in the institutional arrangements based on the principle of unanimity. Indeed, the very pillar structure of the EU treaties – separating the ‘Community pillar’ from the special regime that governs CFSP and parts of Justice and Home Affairs – is a hallmark of an arrangement in which member states have sought to minimise the role of supranational institutions and preserve national autonomy. And yet

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy