Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Heikki Patomäki

the relationship between the United States and the United Nations’. 8 However, he also asked for relative autonomy, for instance in a meeting with Secretary of State Warren Christopher and the US Ambassador to the UN Madeleine Albright: ‘I know that I must have the US support to succeed. But,’ I said, ‘please allow me from time

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

conflict of March–June 1999 was the mounting Albanian–Serb tension and violence of the previous decade. The Albanians, who had enjoyed a measure of autonomy in Communist Yugoslavia; controlling such things as local administration and education, saw this swept away from the late 1980s. This happened in the face of resurgent Serb nationalism and, more particularly, the policies of President Milosevic who exploited it to strengthen

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Maja Zehfuss

identified by Western governments as ‘Kosovo’, a Serbian term, whereas Albanians refer to ‘Kosova’. Both mean ‘blackbird’. The problem is, whether the place in question rightfully belongs to Serbia as the birthplace of the Serb nation in the 1398 battle on the ‘Kosovo’ field, 14 or whether autonomy or even independence should be granted to ‘Kosova’ on the grounds that its population

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Virtuousness, virtuality and virtuosity in NATO’s representation of the Kosovo campaign
Andreas Behnke

Albanians’. Until 1989, there had been general peace in the area. However, ‘Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic altered the status of the region, removing its autonomy and bringing it under the direct control of Belgrade, the Serbian capital’. This action by Milosevic, NATO suggests, was at the core of the conflict between the Serbs and the Kosovar Albanians, as the latter ‘strenuously opposed the move

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Reflections in a distorting mirror
Christoph Zürcher

over the question of the status of these second-level units. Chechnya, Kosovo, Nagorno-Karabakh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia were all ethnically defined territorial units within the Soviet or Yugoslav republics. All of them turned violent, when they started seeking greater autonomy or even independence. Thus, the legacy of the socialist ethno-federalism proved to be especially prone to conflict. When the empire broke down

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Democratisation, nationalism and security in former Yugoslavia
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

regards an ultimate political settlement. Here it was made clear that establishing democracy was part of the international community’s intention for Kosovo’s future. This annex provided for the: establishment of an interim administration for Kosovo as a part of the international civil presence under which the people of Kosovo can enjoy substantial autonomy within the Federal

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

of a regime. 1 This presents the international community with a paradox. Bruce Cronin highlighted the difficulties of humanitarian intervention when he wrote: On one hand, international law and diplomatic practice are clearly biased in favor of state autonomy in matters that are considered to be domestic … On the other hand

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

not support independence and we do not support maintenance of the status quo. We support an enhanced status for Kosovo within the FRY’. 1 In effect this would have restored the status quo ante of the period up to 1989, before President Milosevic removed much of the autonomy formerly enjoyed by Kosovo within Communist Yugoslavia. When Russia and the NATO members began to disagree, it was over the possible use of coercion in

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security