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Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

did with increasing autonomy, using the hospital’s status as self-supporting to disregard the authority of the local missionary governing board at Namirembe. 68 Most prominent among these activities were medical consultations, which had multiplied with the opening of new government hospitals in the early 1920s. Mengo Hospital continued to house the only X-ray equipment in Uganda until 1938, and at least one of

in Beyond the state
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Looking beyond the state

interventionist hand of central government was very much felt, but this claim is rather an acknowledgement of the relative fluidity and autonomy of space in which, for better or for worse, local colonial governments necessarily operated. Indeed, it was precisely this local freedom that allowed many of the interactions with non-government actors that are described in the pages that follow. The Colonial Medical

in Beyond the state

approach to development with some long-standing laissez-faire principles. Two wider political issues made Colonial Office attempts to persuade the Caribbean colonies to follow its preferred routes to industrialisation difficult, however. The increasing political autonomy of governments in the Caribbean region meant that Britain could not merely instruct its West Indian possessions to follow its edicts. In addition, it became clear that in the post-war world, the US hoped to shape development across the Caribbean along lines that it found conducive to its own interests

in Science at the end of empire

provide autonomy and status for scientific researchers working in government service. The fact that the discourse on science and development that emerged in the 1940s could encompass both the idea of research as the basis of planning and research as an activity in which freedom for researchers was paramount was possible because of the multiple meanings that could be attached to the idea of fundamental research. This was a concept of considerable political utility. Research and colonial development after 1940 In 1938, the

in Science at the end of empire
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colonialism and oppression, but linked cultural determination to political autonomy. Its final resolution declared: We maintain that the growth of culture is dependent upon the termination of such shameful practices in this twentieth century as colonialism, the oppression of weaker peoples and racialism

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

sold locally in Trinidad and was used on floors and furniture at the San Fernando Hospital. The focus on the development of compounds ready for the market shows clearly that the emphasis on ‘fundamental research’ in the original discussions of the CPRC and at the opening of the Trinidad laboratory did not mean that applied science and practical issues were to be neglected. Describing the work of the laboratory as ‘fundamental research’ allowed Wiggins the autonomy to pursue long-term and in-depth studies in organic chemistry if he wished. It did

in Science at the end of empire
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‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’

, governors represented the great Father/Mother over the seas who had guaranteed their protection. Sydenham, however, was also charged with responsibility for negotiating settler demands for increased autonomy and access to lands. In moderating these demands the governor knew that he could expect little support from a Colonial Office anxious to rid the British taxpayer of the cost of the annual distribution of

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?

colonies of South Australia, Victoria and Tasmania. British humanitarians – anticipating quite correctly that colonists would swiftly thereafter demand greater autonomy, if not responsible government – pressed the Government to protect the rights of Aborigines in the new constitutions before it lost its last chance to exert any further real control. On 20 March 1850 a deputation

in Equal subjects, unequal rights

and appeal directly to Prince Alfred, handing him a letter to the Great White Queen herself. 26 Despite the capricious nature of British protection in the past, the Basuto king continued to assert his loyalty to the Queen and his alliance with the British as the only hope for the long-term stability and autonomy of his besieged kingdom even in the context of British abandonment. After all, Victoria was not the first

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

the sort of conditions for scientists that could be found through academic study or work with one of Britain’s research councils. When scientists from the research councils – the MRC, ARC and DSIR – advocated a commitment to fundamental research in the colonies, they sought most frequently freedom for scientists from oversight by individuals that were not qualified and experienced researchers themselves. The result was a string of research laboratories and stations in the Colonial Empire that enjoyed a significant degree of autonomy with

in Science at the end of empire