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The PRIA experience
Mandakini Pant

4 Building community-based research capacity with communities: the PRIA experience Mandakini Pant Introduction Indian society has been traditionally divided into endogamous hereditary groups (castes) ranked by ritual status. The castes in lower hierarchy were historically associated with ritually impure occupations such as killing, handling of animal cadavers or night soil. Social distance from upper castes was maintained by restrictions of contact and commensality with members of upper castes. Castebased positioning created caste-based inequalities. Marginalized

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Building High-tech Castles in the Air?
Anisa Jabeen Nasir Jafar

disasters are a good example of this. Even on a smaller scale, one has only to look to mass-casualty incidents in well-resourced settings. Much as plans and protocols may be in place, the need and requirement of the circumstance pushes the limits of capacity, and therefore it is necessary for healthcare (in needing to deliver the most for the most) to focus much more heavily and widely on the rudimentary stages of casualty management and triage. Certainly, the return to ‘normal’ in well

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Emmanuelle Strub

maintaining consent from beneficiaries, local authorities, belligerents and other stakeholders’ ( Fast and O’Neill, 2010 ). And building such relationships requires not only time but human resources with interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills. Although those annual security trainings were an opportunity to remind colleagues that implementing an acceptance strategy required budgeting and planning, only once in five years was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

the poor who suffer the worst. Whether it is in a typhoon-prone or earthquake-prone area, look where the rich people live and look where the poorer people live and see who lives in the most vulnerable areas and the most vulnerable buildings. The British Medical Journal banned the word ‘accident’, as most injuries and their precipitating events are both predictable and preventable. So too are disasters, and ‘natural’ can usefully be discarded as an accompanying epithet

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

maps, which provided close to real-time information about the location of injured persons and infrastructure damage ( Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, 2011 ; Munro, 2013 ). To amplify the capacity for translation, a group from Microsoft, Stanford University and Carnegie Mellon University also created a Machine Translation (MT – automatic, computer translation) engine from Creole to English ( Lewis et al. , 2011 ). These initiatives proved useful in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

, 2015 ; Tengbeh et al. , 2018 ; Wilkinson and Fairhead, 2017 ; Wilkinson et al. , 2017 ). Building on this work, our ethnographic case studies aim to understand the sources and contingent nature of the legitimacy of a large-scale humanitarian intervention. We represent the Ebola response as a dynamic interaction between local populations, intermediaries and resource brokers, with uncertain outcomes that were negotiated over time and in response to rapidly changing

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

current structural, technical or resource capacity of the humanitarian system to respond to people in crisis with any proven efficacy ( Checchi et al. , 2016 ; Colombo and Pavignani, 2017 ; Spiegel, 2017 ). The most confronting factor is the magnitude of threat faced by communities from the deterioration of the physical environment and destruction of natural ecosystems on which their lives depend. The biological systems required to sustain human health and life are not recovering from

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War
Xavier Crombé and Joanna Kuper

differing views on the responsibility and capacity of an international NGO to protect its staff and, more widely, the local community, amid fears of new episodes of violence. For months after MSF returned to Leer, its team operated with a donkey cart as its sole means of transportation, and the hospital was only partly functional, notably lacking surgical capacity. The enduring instability and the risk of a new attack on the town made the organisation hesitant about reinvesting in a fully

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

diagnosis, building in constant prototyping, tolerating failure and changing institutional incentives to counter professional mental models and rule-based thinking ( ibid .: 192–3). The aim of adaptive design is to correct the cognitive biases of aid managers while, through increasing bandwidth, encouraging the agency, auto-projectising and self-acting capacities of the precariat. Important here is strengthening the empathy of managers while improving the users’ experience of the system. The Humanitarian Policy Group’s ( HPG, 2018 ), A

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

received more political support than any other innovation, particularly with the High Level Panel on Humanitarian Cash Transfers convened by DFID. Most of the effort in the sector has gone towards building an innovation ecosystem ( Ramalingam et al. , 2015 ) that can support improved innovation processes ( Obrecht and Warner, 2016 ) – not in itself a worthless task but one which fails to address the most critical barrier to both the generation and adoption of innovation. In the Marxian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs