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’Neill, 2010 ). And building such relationships requires not only time but human resources with interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills. Although those annual security trainings were an opportunity to remind colleagues that implementing an acceptance strategy required budgeting and planning, only once in five years was I able to train operations managers in headquarters on negotiating access. ‘Security is everyone’s responsibility’ was another mantra at departure-preparation awareness-raising sessions. If everyone was responsible for their own behaviour and for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement

picture of engagement in practice, revealing murky social dynamics in some encounters, including aggressive appeals for collaboration, top-down decision-making and a lack of accountability ( Calain and Poncin, 2015 ; Carrión et al., 2016 ; Cohn and Kutalek 2016 ; Gomez-Temesio and Le Marcis, 2017 ; Oosterhoff and Wilkinson, 2015 ; Tengbeh et al. , 2018 ; Wilkinson and Fairhead, 2017 ; Wilkinson et al. , 2017 ). Building on this work, our ethnographic case studies aim to understand the sources and contingent nature of the legitimacy of a large

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

member suggested that this expectation was shared by the local population, recalling: ‘When I was in the bush, people from the community even asked me “but you work for MSF, why are you with us?” … I thought MSF was supposed to look after us. But, they left us.’ Others had a more nuanced view, acknowledging that, unlike organisations with only a few local employees, MSF could not be expected to evacuate its 240 staff and their families. Still, the remarks pointed to differing views on the responsibility and capacity of an international NGO to protect its staff and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

diagnosis, building in constant prototyping, tolerating failure and changing institutional incentives to counter professional mental models and rule-based thinking ( ibid .: 192–3). The aim of adaptive design is to correct the cognitive biases of aid managers while, through increasing bandwidth, encouraging the agency, auto-projectising and self-acting capacities of the precariat. Important here is strengthening the empathy of managers while improving the users’ experience of the system. The Humanitarian Policy Group’s ( HPG, 2018 ), A

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

-approved ‘reforms’. 3 This ‘catastrophic’ decision ( AFP, 2018 ) was widely denounced around the world as a form of collective punishment against the Palestinian people ( Bachner, 2018 ; Dumper, 2018 ). By the end of August 2018, when the US Government announced its decision to completely defund UNRWA, commentators identified this as part of a strategy to force Palestinian refugees to rescind the Right of Return to Palestine (a right set out in UNGA Resolution 194). 4 Many noted that undermining the Agency’s capacity to deliver relief and services

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

institutional vacuum in the post-Soviet geopolitical space has both contributed to such problems and impeded their successful resolution. The post-Soviet states have been forced to rebuild themselves by establishing basic institutions of governance and administration. At the same time the massive legitimacy problems they face call for nation building, along either inclusive/ civic or exclusive/ethnic lines. Moreover, the post-Soviet transition is further complicated by its taking place in the context of globalisation and as such is marked by heightened economic

in Limiting institutions?

: scaling down ambitions to match capabilities and/or building up capabilities to sustain ambitions. Effectiveness denotes the capacity to implement policies. Arguably, state consolidation depends on some balance between the institutionalisation of state structures and the incorporation of mobilised social forces into them (Huntington 1968). A balance endows elites with both sufficient autonomy to make rational choices and sufficient legitimacy and structural capacity to mobilise the support and extract the resources to sustain these choices

in The international politics of the Middle East

been engaged in long-term security building on the ground in zones of potential or actual conflict. This leaves the OSCE as the only multilateral institution with a mandate and capacity to carry out the functions of conflict prevention and resolution in areas of tension within the broad European region it covers. Furthermore, this capacity has grown considerably throughout the past decade and, as I will argue below, its potential for further growth is great. When the CPC was first created by the Charter of Paris in 1990, it had a very limited mandate and a minute

in Limiting institutions?
What contribution to regional security?

assist in the formulation of clear economic objectives for the region towards the supplementary goal of conflict prevention and management. The BSEC process of region building could also lead to the redefinition of the identity, interests and capacities of its member-states, which would, in turn, help create conditions for a system of institutionalised negotiation or conflict resolution that would enhance regional security and stability. The area where the BSEC can make a positive contribution is in postconflict rehabilitation of conflict zones. The area covered by

in Limiting institutions?

building, and nails and pressure cookers.10 Communication intercepts with the Milan cell also suggested that some kind of poison gas was being prepared.11 The action by German authorities provided information that led to Operation Odin in Britain and the arrest of ten suspected terrorists in February 2001.12 Although most of them were freed, Abu Doha – one of the three key members of the al-Qaeda network in Europe – and Mustapha Labsi, who was alleged to be a coconspirator in the Los Angeles bomb plot, remained under arrest.13 Members of the Milan cell were subsequently

in Limiting institutions?