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Continuous theatre for a creative city

construction grew, the Loire was dredged to accommodate larger shipyards building larger ships. Seventeenth-century maps of Nantes depict a latticework of bridges connecting some ten or twelve small Resurfacing 141 islands to each other and to the Loire’s northern bank. With the growth of the shipbuilding industry, dredging operations displaced silt to the smaller fingers of the river, gradually forming a single land mass out of multiple islands. The northernmost islands became part of the mainland, while the others formed what is today the single Ile de Nantes. The

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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Putting the countryside back to work

established enterprise.’7 When Photosacs relocated its manufacturing activities to Corbigny in 1961, the company took over an existing concrete structure of 450 square metres on land owned by the municipality. Thanks to increased demand from Kodak and Gevaert, Photosacs was able to triple its productive surface area; two additional structures of identical footprint were added behind the original building (see figure 2.1). To convert Photosacs into La Transverse, project architect Patrick Warnant opted to preserve the two rear additions and raze the original building facing

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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The imaginary archaeology of redevelopment

’s production process typically involves archival research and ethnographic interviews about the history of a neighbourhood or building. In performance, company members project these primary materials onto the exterior walls of the neighbourhood or building in question. This chapter takes up two of KompleX’s artistic interventions into industrial space, PlayRec (2006–08) and SPP (short for Sentier Pédestre Périphérique (Peripheral Pedestrian Path), 2011–12). For PlayRec, a touring production, KompleX developed site-specific performances that engaged with derelict or converted

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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Frank O’Hara

'Hara 137 amount of energy he invested in our art and our lives made me feel like a miser. (H, 99) One expression of that energy was, as Rivers indicated, O’Hara’s capacity for intimacy, where intimacy meant not just friendship but a detailed understanding of the artist friend’s work. Philip Guston recalls a conversation with O’Hara: Frank was in his most non-stop way of talking; saying that the pictures put him in mind of Tiepolo ... Suddenly I was working in an ancient building now a warehouse facing the Giudecca. The loft over the Firehouse was transformed. It was

in Enthusiast!
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Working memory

wrecking ball had already reduced to rubble before a successful lobbying effort by locals and preservationists to designate the building a heritage site. Stéphane Bonnard is not (primarily) a heritage preservationist. He is, with Pierre Duforeau, co-artistic director of street theatre company KompleXKapharnaüM. Since its founding in 1995, KompleXKapharnaüM has worked out of a former metal parts factory in what is now the Carré de Soie. KompleXKapharnaüM creates sitespecific, multimedia performances that engage local memory, industrial and working-class heritage, and

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
The paradoxes of sustainability and Michel Houellebecq’s The Possibility of an Island

sheer biology, as both de-individualised and de-socialised, and as utterly overwhelmed by its own inherited drive to reproduce and consume. Far from demonstrating that humans are somehow unnatural, our tendency to multiply beyond the Earth’s carrying capacity is a sign that we are indeed a biological species just like any other, fully in the thrall of blind evolutionary forces that lie beyond our control. The story of human ascendancy is revealed as a kind of Kippfigur: a reversible image in which two contradictory meanings continually displace each other. The maggots

in Literature and sustainability
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White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy

and uproot early experiences of hunger, violence, hurt, death, abandonment and neglect in ways enabling therapeutic healing. This chapter asks what makes the traumatised and vulnerable super-​rich white man appealing as a heterosexual fantasy figure. In order to unravel vulnerability as both a fantasy that lends the series much of its commercial power and a narrative instrument deployed in character building, I first examine the use of generic romance and erotica conventions (e.g. Radway, 1984; Snitow, 1983) as well as the gendered forms of affective labour that the

in The power of vulnerability
The poetics of sustainability and the politics of what we’re sustaining

‘the recording’ of weather data and ‘the news’ that relays it. Notably, these occur before sensory confirmation, ‘Also the body says it’ (3). The priority of media over physical experience signals the ubiquity of discourse in our construction of the world, and in this capacity the poem reflects Graham’s continuing concern with ‘[h]ow to give bodily perception its due in thought’, which Vendler finds as ‘already vexing’ the poet’s earlier verse (1995: 96). Jorie Graham’s Sea Change 215 What Scigaj refers to as ‘actual lived experience’, then, still requires a

in Literature and sustainability
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Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality

critical investigation of conceptual frameworks and social systems that occlude the agency and interests of nonhuman others, along with the ‘ecological services’, upon which human social and economic sustainability remain dependent. In ‘Nature in the Active Voice’, she goes on to suggest how certain forms of writing can help to loosen modern cultures out of the bonds of human self-enclosure by providing a space for what she calls an ‘animating sensibility and vocabulary’ (Plumwood 2009: 126) that recognises other-than-human creative agencies, communicative capacities and

in Literature and sustainability
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James Schuyler

. Stevens’ complaint that the music of poetry has suffered from the passage 174 Enthusiast! Essays on Modern American Literature of time remains true, especially in British universities, where the pressure is constantly on to convert the experience of reading into something else, some other skill or outcome. In such an environment Schuyler’s poetry exists as an education in the qualities and capacities of literary language. But there is more to the pleasure of uttering than the simple relishing of words, as a glance at another Schuyler collage, ‘An East Window on

in Enthusiast!