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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

accompanying books which acted as companions 5 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 6 to JFK and Nixon. Clocking in at more than 500 pages each, the books were less often remembered for having pro-​and anti-​voices, historicism and observations concerning the presentation of Kennedy’s assassination and Nixon’s fall from grace and then from office, than they were for being extended bids at convincing his audience that Stone was right about the historical theses that he presented in these pictures. Did the change in decades, and hence alteration in the political atmosphere

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

talked about, and combative, filmmaker of his generation. Interview with Oliver Stone, 19 January 2010 In relation to the Classification and Ratings Administration Interviewer: How do you see the issue of cinematic censorship? Oliver Stone: The ratings thing is very much a limited game. If you talk to Joan Graves, you’ll get the facts. The rules are the rules. They change with societal norms. You can now have a kiss between homosexuals. In Alexander you can even have someone go to bed with the man. The only guideline that now exists as far as I know would be the word

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

changed in rather complicated ways. Not only had they changed since the time of Oliver Stone’s original Wall Street in 1987, but they had renegotiated their relationship with institutions and the public in a dramatically short space of time: over the previous two-​and-​a-​half years. Therefore, Stone’s updating of arch protagonist Gordon Gekko’s exploits for the financially strapped twenty-​first century was a prescient cautionary tale and a morality fable of sorts; but it was also a vignette about Hollywood as an industry, as it gravitated increasingly towards box

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

, where much of the rest of the film resides. Although the tone of the film and the characters’ attitudes towards women changes after the pair find their way to El Salvador, this initial exchange is emblematic of critical perceptions towards gender and sex that Stone epitomised for some, particularly in his emergent phase as a writer and filmmaker. Salvador offers more evidence too. Boyle’s girlfriend Maria (Elpidia Carrillo) is a central motivation for his character to evolve, and she is in considerable danger as the narrative progresses. Yet the screenplay gives her

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

 –​does capture some aspects of Stone’s presence as an auteur, but it provides an incomplete picture. Stone’s writing and his editorial eye do provide a ‘signature’ that has remained relatively stable across all of his dramatic oeuvre. Yet as we have described, other aspects of that signature changed from the mid-​1990s, as evidenced by a less realist and more distinct melodramatic aesthetic and, by many accounts, reduced polemical force. Melodrama comes to the fore in U Turn, Alexander and W., with all three films foregrounding questions of personal morality. Wall Street

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

triggered his imagination, and produced a dawning realisation that photography provided a bridge between internal writing processes and the outside world.8 Stone arrived back in the USA in November 1968, to a country changed by the war in a manner later brought to life in Born on the Fourth of July (1989). The clichés and stereotypes have now taken a hold in the popular imagination, but for Stone, the fallout and rehabilitation were all too real. He took a road trip through California and on into Mexico. Upon his return, he was arrested in San Diego for possession of

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

-​serving, in Stone’s view. However, he also affirmed where the potential for good within American corporations lay, and how the forces of nationalism and patriotism could be countered within their boardrooms and trading floors.6 It was a hopeful stance that would not last long with Stone. He later concluded that little had changed since the late 1980s; far from countering the forces of America’s capitalist behemoth, corporations were, and remained, instrumental in driving those same forces forward. In 1988, a year after Wall Street, Stone returned to corporations, but this

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

energy that he ultimately committed to the project. This was no lightweight dalliance with the idea of a political film that might add some gravitas to his filmmaking credentials. Stone had been changed by what he saw in El Salvador, and was committed to putting the country’s story on screen. Yet, while Orion Pictures had first option on distributing Salvador, its CEO Mike Medavoy chose to pass, citing the film as just too violent and bloody –​if anything, it was too committed. Into Orion’s shoes stepped small British company, Hemdale. Hemdale had bankrolled the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Continuity and change
Erin Bell and Ann Gray

Queen. In this chapter, we therefore focus on the ways in which two British broadcasters, the BBC and Channel 4, handled coverage of the monarchy during a particularly sensitive period for the Windsor family of ageing and generational change. These events culminated in the commemoration of Queen Elizabeth’s sixtieth year on the throne, the speculation surrounding Prince Charles as the oldest heir

in The British monarchy on screen
Isabel Quigly

wonderful way of earning, not perhaps a living, but at least a crust. Soon afterwards I was asked, out of the blue, to be film critic of the Spectator , and entered what now seems a very foreign country indeed, the film world of the 1950s, in which I stayed for ten years. It was a past separated from us today not just by the changes in films and film-making, but by the social upheavals between then and now

in British cinema of the 1950s