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Paul Currion

sector sometimes seem to bear down on each new innovation lab. To some extent, this is a problem that we have created for ourselves; the same tide of optimism that previously lifted us up is now receding, and we risk being beached. The limitations of innovation are now clear. Innovation ‘looked at as a process, appears suspiciously like the reforms of yesteryear’ ( Sandvik, 2014 : 27), potentially exposes vulnerable communities to new types of risk, and risks marginalising local aid workers and disaster

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, improving customer value and effectively managing competitive risk ( Keohane, 2013 ; Quitzau, 2010 ; Tidd et al. , 2001 ). There are many parallels between the evolution of innovation practice within the private sector and that of the humanitarian sector. Chesbrough (2006) used the term ‘open innovation’ to explain the shift in the way companies had been innovating. Historically, businesses attempted to internalise the creative and innovative process, funding large research

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

humanitarians have historically engaged in the problem of emergency shelter ( Burnell and Sanderson, 2011 ; Davis, 2011 ). For many years, the idea that ‘shelter is a process not a product’ has been one of the most central, foundational principles of the sector: the notion that humanitarians should help people shelter themselves, rather than providing a completed building to inhabit ( Davis, 1978 ; Davis and Alexander, 2015 ; Sanderson and Burnell, 2013 ). Final structures and prefabricated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

enough. And I’m saying the opposite now. Practice has changed, but I think you’ve got to get the evidence and the data. The innovations from these measurements that will have the biggest impacts will not be technological: they will be process-driven. GS: Did any innovative practices emerge later in your career that you wished had arrived earlier? TR: Yes, the point-of-care testing. The handheld devices for testing. So, you can test for malaria, for example. And the big one is the handheld

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
José Luís Fiori

national interests ( ibid .: 25–6): 1) Russia and China, the two great ‘revisionist powers’; 2) North Korea and Iran, two ‘rogue states’ that undermine geopolitical equilibrium in Northeast Asia and the Middle East; 3) ‘Jihadist terrorist groups’ and international criminal organisations that propagate violence and traffic drugs and arms. The document offers an extensive list of actions to be undertaken by the US to achieve strategic objectives and confront rivals, from controlling borders to increasing military expenditure and protecting competitive

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Israel and a Palestinian state
Lenore G. Martin

, represented by the Palestinian Authority (PA), is clearly an international actor; however, the PA’s status is uncertain in the face of the collapse of the peace process. 8 The peace process reached a crisis in the latter part of 2000 and the winter of early 2001 when Palestinians and Israelis were unable to resolve final status issues, and the second intifada broke out. 9 If the peace process were to collapse completely

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism
Andrew Jones

The immediate consequence of this shift was an internal review of the government’s administrative machinery for emergency relief. A policy paper in early 1974 opened with the revealing statement that ‘the problem of disaster relief in developing countries is one of which governments are becoming increasingly aware’. 60 This reform process took on a more radical character following the election of a

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Raymond Hinnebusch

the many; as such, it was an obstacle to rather than an impetus to democratisation. The Arab–Israeli peace process dead-ended and arms races actually accelerated. While the intractability of regional conflicts and problems helped derail the benign promise of globalisation, an equally important factor was the way the much-intensified penetration of American hegemonic power was applied in the region. There is much debate over whether a world hegemon exercises its power in a largely self-interested way or whether successful hegemony means satisfying the interests of a

in The international politics of the Middle East
Raymond Hinnebusch

It is frequently claimed that foreign policy making in Middle East states is either the idiosyncratic product of personalistic dictators or the irrational outcome of domestic instability. In fact, it can only be adequately understood by analysis of the multiple factors common to all states, namely: (1) foreign policy determinants (interests, challenges) to which decision-makers respond when they shape policies; and (2) foreign policy structures and processes which factor the ‘inputs’ made by various actors into a policy addressing these

in The international politics of the Middle East
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

marketisation of humanitarianism (specifically monetised humanitarian action) has inevitably shaped the competitive commodification of both ‘distant suffering’ and ‘caring at a distance’ by the mass media. In turn, humanitarian organisations have become ‘market’ players. For Ian Smillie and Larry Minear ( 2004 ) the ‘humanitarian enterprise’ refers to ‘the global network of organisations involved in assistance and

in Global humanitarianism and media culture