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Edited by: Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin and Alan Warde

This book explores the new applications of established theories or adapts theoretical approaches in order to illuminate behaviour in the field of food. It focuses on social processes at the downstream end of the food chain, processes of distribution and consumption. The book reviews the existing disciplinary approaches to understanding judgements about food taste. It suggests that the quality 'halal' is the result of a social and economic consensus between the different generations and cultures of migrant Muslims as distinct from the non-Muslim majority. Food quality is to be viewed in terms of emergent cognitive paradigms sustained within food product networks that encompass a wide range of social actors with a wide variety of intermediaries, professional and governmental. The creation of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) occurred at a juncture when perceptions of policy failure were acknowledged at United Kingdom and European Union governmental levels. The book presents a case study of retailer-led food governance in the UK to examine how different 'quality logics' actually collide in the competitive world of food consumption and production. It argues that concerns around food safety were provoked by the emergence of a new food aesthetic based on 'relationalism' and 'embeddedness'. The book also argues that the study of the arguments and discourses deployed to criticise or otherwise qualify consumption is important to the political morality of consumption.

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Roslyn Kerr

cases, it is very difficult for an athlete or coach to determine the exact state of the actor-network inside the body. This problem is generally solved by enrolling sports scientists and medical professionals into the sporting arena. Indeed, experts in sports science and medicine are now assumed to make up a significant part of a competitive athlete’s actor-network. These experts have a range of technological tools at their disposal that are able to reveal the inner workings of the body and suggest solutions

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Theorising food quality

Some key issues in understanding its competitive production and regulation

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Terry Marsden

chap 6 13/8/04 4:23 pm Page 129 6 Theorising food quality: some key issues in understanding its competitive production and regulation Terry Marsden Introduction Recent debates concerning food quality offer an important window on the changing nature of broader social, political and economic relations. Not least, this has reinforced a more serious concern with understanding food consumption processes; through more theorisation and conceptualisation of social and natural factors in the context of wider consumption trends and processes (see Goodman 2002). In

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Roslyn Kerr

particular technologies or not to dope because of their desire for purity, to keep their bodies and sport clean and untainted. For example, US 5000m athletics champion Lauren Fleshman publicly criticised Lance Armstrong on the grounds that he undermined fair play, which she believed defined sporting practice (see Fleshman, 2013 ). Fleshman’s stance assumes an amateur ethos that places fair play ahead of winning, and harks back to a romanticised view of sport as historically free from overly competitive practices

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Conclusion

Quality and processes of qualification

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Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin and Alan Warde

quality’ becomes a historical and comparative matter – one of ‘when and in what circumstances?’. One might argue that there are now rather more agencies involved in the process of qualification than in the past. More departments of state take an interest in the various attributes of food system – nutrition, safety, economic competitiveness, national interest. The EC presents an additional level of regulatory activity: new agencies, like the FSA in the UK, have come into being, taxed with an impartial advisory role and speaking especially as the voice of consumers who

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Enhancement

Which technologies are improved, and how?

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Roslyn Kerr

that are much faster than all the other designs. Hence, there have been certain approaches (such as active suspension systems or turbo charging) that have been killed off, either in their infancy or at some later stage, through the regulative processes surrounding motor sport. (Pinch and Henry, 1999 , p. 668) This statement reveals how the teams are aware of the importance of retaining a close competitive race in order for their sport to continue to be viable and

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From constitutional to political asymmetry

Crafting authoritarian regimes in Russia’s regions and republics

Cameron Ross

a democracy: FAD9 10/17/2002 6:03 PM 158 Page 158 Federalism and democratisation in Russia 1) All citizens must have the right to vote, with no exclusion based on sex, race, opinion or religion, 2) voting must be secret so as to minimize potential intimidation, 3) the election must be regular: it must be held at steady intervals, as prescribed by law, 4) the whole process must be fair, devoid of violence or fraud and, 5) finally, the election must be competitive, that is to say, all positions can be contested, all groups or parties may run candidates and

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Leslie Haddon

visions of consumers, are introduced into the design process, we need first to appreciate the origins of and stages in formulating innovative ideas. Although the marketing literature often talks about the pre-eminence of consumer demand, in the three areas studied producers clearly did not start with the questions of what people might need, what their interests were or what they currently desired. Rather, these producers were usually aware of technological possibilities, they were aware of their firm’s competitive advantages and they searched for ways in which a

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Vivien Walsh, Carole Cohen and Albert Richards

representations of otherwise inaccessible end users or customers: to access who the customers were, what their needs and wants might be, and The incorporation of user needs 181 what their use of the product or service was likely to be, and then tried to build them into the design and development process. What are the users’ needs? Concern with meeting user needs more effectively has been one of the responses of telecom equipment suppliers to changes in their competitive environment following deregulation and privatisation, and the technological changes associated with the

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Pier Paolo Saviotti

productivity improvements in existing sectors. In this sense the complementarity between variety growth and productivity growth in existing sectors bears a considerable similarity to that between productivity growth in agriculture and investment in the new industries during the process of industrialisation (see Kuznets, 1965; Landes, 1998). Further support for the role of variety in economic development comes from Romer’s models (1987, 1990) that include a growth in the number of capital goods among the consequences of innovation. Variety and demand If the overall variety of