Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • competitive process x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state

Perhaps surprisingly, medical recruitment was always something of an uphill battle, especially when compared to the large competitive demand for the general civil service jobs of Empire. The Indian Civil Service, which required candidates to pass a competitive examination before being offered a position, was regarded as particularly esteemed and could command the very brightest and best young graduates

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts

demonstrating efficacy that early missionary and colonial doctors possessed. Correspondingly, it was much sought after. In Northern Ngoniland, for example, it was one form of Western medicine for which people were eagerly willing to pay, even though the process of vaccinations was often hindered by the failure of the lymph supply. 40 Furthermore, large-scale campaigns required vaccinators, and at the turn of the

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)

based upon mimicking Britain. Clearly, there was in that regard considerable regional variation within Canada, but I argue that a dominant, if changing, narrative did exist. Further, tracing the history of the IODE reveals a shifting focus from that of a Canada seeking a ‘sense of power’ within the British Empire to that of a nation situated in its own geographic space. How this process came about is

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

fermentation processes amongst British scientists, both in university departments and chemical companies. The endorsement by some eminent chemists of the potential of using sugar to make fuels and synthetic goods was crucial in persuading officials at the Colonial Office of the validity of a programme of research in this area. The first suggestion raised amongst Colonial Office officials was to use sugar to make power alcohol for use as aviation spirit, thereby meeting a wartime need. Treasury funds were likely to be forthcoming for a proposal to

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples

economic and resource potential of the Arctic. 18 The IODE president stated in her opening speech at the 1959 National Meeting in Regina: ‘The great mineral wealth of the Arctic is just beginning to be tapped. The Canadian Government is in the process of building roads to link strategic points and it is inevitable that communities will follow the industries as they are established.’ 19 After the Second

in Female imperialism and national identity

that our findings might be influenced by a desire on the part of the United Kingdom manufacturers to restrain the development of industries in Colonies which might be competitive with exports from the United Kingdom’. The final report offered reassurance that the intention was to make recommendations that would first and foremost be of benefit to the Caribbean, even when they might negatively affect British exports. Alongside these claims, the report began with an upbeat appraisal of the prospects for future industrial development in the Caribbean, stating that ‘the

in Science at the end of empire