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) recognition into a question and ask not only ‘ what is recognition? ’ but also ‘ how is recognition produced if it is not automatically extended to the other? ’ Answering such questions foregrounds the political and institutional translation of basic forms of human sociality in the constitution of world society, with profound implications for a globalizing international relations

in Recognition and Global Politics

injury. That large-scale human rights abuse is not something that happens only ‘somewhere else’ – perpetrated by other peoples or at other times, or in societies with authoritarian political structures or poverty-stricken economies, underdeveloped legal systems or immature ‘civil societies’ – is a simple point that can nevertheless prove extraordinarily difficult to grasp in practice. This case study thus considers some of the limitations of those dominant understandings of rights that mark both international rights promotion and the constitution

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)

East Timor, with elections for a constituent assembly to determine a constitution expected in August 2001. The following discussion looks in broad terms at the immediate background to Indonesia’s violent process of incorporation and the pattern of abuse that characterised it, and touches briefly some of the issues facing the new state. It does not focus on East Timor’s political struggles or the development of its contemporary political forms. As told here, the story of East Timor’s occupation underlines what in conceptual terms is a very simple

in Human rights and the borders of suffering

The Countries of Western Europe Austria Population 8.1 million (2000) Capital Vienna Territory 83,857 sq. km GDP per capita US$25,788 (2000) Unemployment 3.7 per cent of workforce (2000) State form Republic. The Austrian constitution of 1920, as amended in 1929, was restored on 1 May 1945. On 15 May 1955, the four Allied Powers signed the

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Open Access (free)

British entry to the EEC. 22 January 1972 Treaty of Accession signed by which the United Kingdom joins the EEC. 30 January 1972 ‘Bloody Sunday’: soldiers fire on a procession in Londonderry (Northern Ireland), killing and wounding several people. 31 October 1973 Publication of the Kilbrandon Report from the Royal Commission on the Constitution. It recommends a directly elected

in The politics today companion to West European Politics

The countries of Western Europe allow individuals who claim political persecution in their own country to cross their national borders and apply for political asylum. While the asylum principle is upheld in the Geneva Convention of 1949, asylum entitlement is regulated by each country’s national laws or constitution. Belgium, Sweden, Switzerland and West Germany were popular destinations for asylum seekers because of their

in The politics today companion to West European Politics

-superstructure, but merely to state a rather common sense materialist position, that the political constitution cannot be disconnected from the economic constitution. We can read Hegel's account of the relation between master and slave as a story which emphasizes an important linkage in which the ancient political mode of understanding and self-understanding (i.e., ‘self-consciousness’) is one

in Recognition and Global Politics
Adjusting to life after the Cold War

the Bundeswehr’s remit to avoid the unwanted extension of its role. A further line of argument pressed for an actual change to the constitution as a means of legally sanctioning and thus facilitating Germany’s involvement in UN-mandated peacekeeping operations. The Government’s response to the ending of the Cold War saw the CDU–CSU (Christlich-Soziale Union) pushing for an enlargement of the Bundeswehr’s remit without the prerequisite of a constitutional clarification. Essentially, the gaining of sovereignty brought with it a renewed responsibility, which, according

in Germany and the use of force
Dominant approaches

dynamic and open-ended nature of understanding in general. The significance of being attentive to the partiality of one’s understanding is that such attentiveness can shift, radically or subtly, the way we go about working with particular issues. In particular, one is more likely to be open to a sense of the processes and of the mutuality involved in arriving at understanding – in this case, of the constitution of community and person. One is more likely to listen. To grasp understanding as interactive may be peculiarly relevant to working with

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)

of Cologne in 1945 by the US occupation authorities, when the British took over the administration of the region, they dismissed Adenauer for non-co-operation. He was active in founding the CDU in the British zone of occupation, and became Chairman of the Parliamentary Council (1948–49) which met in Bonn to draft the Basic Law (the provisional constitution for the Federal Republic). He was elected by the Bundestag as the first federal

in The politics today companion to West European Politics