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Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika

over the next 25 years. In 1951, the MMC, still a sub-committee of the newly renamed TMC (now called the Christian Council of Tanganyika), further institutionalised its function as the principal representative organisation of mission health services with a new constitution. To ensure that it spoke for the whole of the membership the MMC was to be open to all medical practitioners working within the

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’

, worried in particular about loss of control of Maori affairs. But they shared with the Australian colonies the conviction that men of European origin should remain in the driver’s seat – aided by the admission of White women to the body politic. In 1870, Earl Grey, who as secretary of state for the colonies from 1846 to 1852 had presided over the preparation of a number of Australasian constitutions, wrote

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?

new Constitution which, members declared, challenged the rights of free British subjects. Members queried in particular the right of the imperial Parliament to appropriate money from the colonial revenue derived from land sales. This demand was enshrined in the 1842 Act for Regulating the Sale of Wasteland, which allowed the governor to appropriate a proportion not exceeding 15 per cent for the

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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Better ‘the Hottentot at the hustings’ than ‘the Hottentot in the wilds with his gun on his shoulder’

of African people living within their borders. The 1839 Constitution of the Boer Republic of Natalia had enshrined annual elections – but for adult White males only. The 1858 Transvaal Constitution stated specifically that ‘the people desire to permit no equality between coloured people and the white inhabitants of the country, either in church or state’. But in the two British colonies, the position

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)

vote in the Glen Grey district even from people who would qualify by virtue of individual tenure. After the South African War, the question of ensuring sufficient ‘Native labour’ for the mines and farms played an important part in deciding the political powers allowed to Indigenes under the Union Constitution and the legislation of the early Union governments. All the colonial politicians operated within

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice

and stories of Cetshwayo’s visit were giving the Maori King false hope. Despite the outward face of the government, William Gladstone’s Colonial Secretary Lord Derby did consider – it seems – Tawhiao’s appeal for imperial intervention. In this context, he sought Jervois’ opinion on the powers granted to Queen Victoria by Section 71 of the New Zealand Constitution Act to ‘provide by

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
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Saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’

: ‘The question of granting franchise to the natives will not be decided till after the introduction of self government.’ 38 In an exchange of telegrams with Milner, Chamberlain queried the wording of the draft article: ‘Seems to be worded so that we should actually have to exclude natives from the Franchise in any constitution establishing a self-governing Colony. Would it not be enough to leave from

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)

the face of sustained Indigenous resistance would eventually become untenable. But its exercise at crucial stages of colonial rule would prove as vital to the later emergence of these ‘democratic’ nations as were the conventions of respectable men who eventually oversaw their official constitution as the century drew to a close. By the late 1830s, however, the point at which we begin our study, the interest of powerful

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)

and Its Monarchy (New York, repr. 2011); Vernon Bogdanor, The Monarchy and the Constitution (New York, 1995); John Cannon, The Modern British Monarchy: A Study in Adaptation (Reading, 1987 ); Margaret Homans, Remaking Queen Victoria (Cambridge, 1997 ); Marilyn Morris, The British Monarchy and the French Revolution (Princeton, 1997); John Plunkett, Queen

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)

Europeans’ constitution of reality had its own exotic and hegemonic quality’. 11 Influenced by Gramsci and the legitimation of domination, Kay Anderson’s work on Vancouver’s Chinatown focuses on the construction of Chinatown according to European ideologies of race and the hegemonic policies those ideas have shaped. 12 In The Mountie from Dime Novel to Disney , Michael Dawson deconstructs the

in Female imperialism and national identity