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Editor: Mandy Merck

Moving images of the British monarchy, in fact and fiction, are almost as old as the moving image itself, dating back to an 1895 dramatic vignette, The Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Led by Queen Victoria, British monarchs themselves appeared in the new 'animated photography' from 1896. Half a century later, the 1953 coronation of Elizabeth II was a milestone in the adoption of television, watched by 20 million Britons and 100 million North Americans. At the century's end, Princess Diana's funeral was viewed by 2.5 billion worldwide. Seventeen essays by international commentators examine the portrayal of royalty in the 'actuality' picture, the early extended feature, amateur cinema, the movie melodrama, the Commonwealth documentary, New Queer Cinema, TV current affairs, the big screen ceremonial and the post-historical boxed set. These contributors include Ian Christie, Elisabeth Bronfen, Andrew Higson, Steven Fielding, Karen Lury, Glyn Davis, Ann Gray, Jane Landman, Victoria Duckett, Jude Cowan Montague, James Downs, Barbara Straumann, Deirdre Gilfedder, Jo Stephenson, Ruth Adams, Erin Bell, Basil Glynn and Nicola Rehling.

past. In particular, I will focus on the most contested and controversial area of contemporary fiction cinema’s representation of the past – the use of documentary images as a mode of imaginative reconstruction or re-enactment. The shift from documentary images being understood as the trace of the past, as something left behind by a past event, to something available for imaginative and poetic

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film

example, has discussed the tensions between official histories and their contestation in ‘popular’ or unofficial memory, analysing the bearing of historical and memorial knowledge on formations of identity and operations of power. In a discussion of ‘film and popular memory’ in French cinema of the 1970s (specifically, a number of films dealing with the French Resistance), Foucault suggests that memory is ‘a very important

in Memory and popular film
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence

a contesting language, which expresses through and with the body ideas of resistance, anger and above all the fact that women’s bodies deserve to take up much more space than that to which they are assigned. Moreover, they show that they do not have to be instructed on how to release into space; and they can share a moment of sensation while showing those characteristics which create differences between all those moving –​and moved –​bodies. The concept of sic-​sensuous carries heavy political weight. Some of the participants in the One Billion Rising flash mob in

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)

thus far, drawing on Rowe’s analysis, the focus has been on the West Bank. In a study of dabke in the Jordan Valley, Mauro Van Aken argues that whereas dabke is perceived in the West Bank as a strong symbol of national identity, in the Jordan Valley it does not constitute an official discourse of dispossessed culture. Rather, he argues, performance of dabke allows for the constitution of a public space allowing for the revelation of relations of identity (Aken 2006). I draw on both readings together to argue that dabke allows for a space for contestation of

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)

theoretical as well as the political motivation for this investigation. Dance, I argue, has always been part of human beings’ lives, though it has not always been understood as a legitimate way to articulate their political self. It is in situations in which human beings started being considered as part of the community through their use of dance that I see the moment of politics in dance happening. This book explores moments in which people contest their marginal positioning through the use of their bodies. This book focuses on moments in which those moving bodies have

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America

returns to the turn of the twentieth-century contestation over collective memory attendant upon the decades of social turbulence beginning in 1880 that some historians have labeled a hegemonic crisis, as immigration, industrialisation and urbanisation rapidly altered the country’s social landscape. The immediate post-World War One years, hailed hopefully as the ‘return to normalcy’, saw instead the

in Memory and popular film

The Special Relationship (directed by Richard Loncraine, 2009) on Blair’s dealings with US presidents Clinton and Bush. In many ways The Queen follows the formula of The Deal as closely as its two-syllable title. Both were directed by Stephen Frears and both focus on real-life political contests in which a frontrunner is defeated by a rival. Real-life Labour spin doctors (Peter Mandelson, played by

in The British monarchy on screen
Gumboot dance in South Africa

creating a strong reading of political dance. This feature should not be read within the context of Western choreographic tradition alone; the use of the chorus as a unison body in motion which expresses the individuality of its members is a narrative that underlies all the case studies discussed thus far. At the same time, in all these discussions I  focus on the interruptive horizons that the chorus opens up rather than the homogenising features of its movement. All these choruses opened up further spheres of contestation and intervention, allowing more voices to join

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory

allegory about the legacy and significance of the 1960s. I am interested in two related issues. At one level, I want to consider how the film operates in the contested field of meaning that, in the 1990s, came to debate the memory of America’s postwar past. This leads to a different, but overlapping, concern: namely, to what effect postmodern technologies and forms of representation impact upon the way

in Memory and popular film