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Producing hyperflexibility

The restructuring of work in Britain

Louise Amoore

’ in its role of safeguarding ‘private interests and the liberation of private energies’ (Gamble, 1994: 72-3). The webs of power surrounding and suffusing industrialisation are revealed to produce the ‘individual’ as the central actor in social change. The cotton industry appeared to require little in the way of state coordination, enabling small-scale private entrepreneurs to ‘launch themselves’ into an international marketplace (Gerschenkron, 1962; Hobsbawm, 1975). The cotton industry was launched, like a glider, by the pull of the colonial trade to which it was