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Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

Death of Neoliberalism or the Triumph of Hayek? ’, Journal of Cultural Economy , 4 : 4 , 371 – 85 . Corlett , A. ( 2017 ), As Time Goes By: Shifting Incomes and Inequality between and within Generations ( London : Intergenerational Commission ). Cornia , G. A. ( 1987 ), ‘ Economic Decline and Human Welfare in the First Half of the 1980s ’, in Cornia , G. A. , Jolly , R. and Stewart , F. (eds), Adjustment with a Human Face: Volume 1 ( Oxford : Clarendon Press ), pp. 11 – 47

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction

Introduction The first thing to say about liberal order is that it hasn’t been that liberal. Since the Second World War, the production of subjects obeisant to the rule of liberal institutions has depended on illiberal and authoritarian methods – not least on the periphery of the world system, where conversion to Western reason has been pursued with particularly millenarian zeal, and violence. The wishful idea of an ever more open and global market economy has been continuously undermined by its champions, with their subsidies and monopolistic

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement

epidemic to a number of factors related to history and international political economy. They range from the legacy of the transatlantic slave trade and colonial histories to economic structures built around international extractive industries and aid dependency ( Benton and Dionne, 2015 ; Richardson et al. , 2016 ; Wilkinson and Fairhead, 2017 ). Externally imposed structural adjustment in the 1980s hollowed out all (non-military) essential state functions. This, in turn, transformed citizens’ relation to and expectations of the postcolonial state and its legitimacy

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister

protectionism. Unfortunately, today, Brazil isn’t exporting a single idea. But when we have a legitimate government once again, Brazil will work on these things and on South–South cooperation. JF: The human rights and humanitarian movements have often been seen as vectors of Western influence – expressions of soft power – not only because of their practices but also because of the cultural origins of their ideals… CA: … Which is not necessarily a bad thing. I was Brazilian representative to the UN in Geneva twice. Although I gave most attention to trade

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

what Barry called ‘the liberal outlook’: secular humanitarians are modern missionaries even in their very being, carrying with them modernity in terms of ideas about gender, sexuality, freedom of choice and more. This is entirely consistent with the emphasis on the consuming individual at the core of the modern market-based global economy. For the majority of humanitarians, a set of rights-based freedoms are ‘normal’. Along with shelter, food and medicine come ways of living that challenge long-established social and cultural norms as well as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From starving children to satirical saviours

contribute to the positivity of the network. To ‘like’ content and ‘pages’ is now the most popular action taken on Facebook; every day the ‘like’ button is hit 3.2 billion times across the world contributing to what some have termed a ‘like economy’. 18 Facebook’s architecture scripts actions that conform to an ‘affirmative atmosphere, in which people only agree and do not disagree or express discontent

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

deficit for several decades. That deficit reflects a long-standing habit: the American economy absorbs more than it yields; it consumes and invests more than it produces. The difference is the habitual external deficit and it has to be financed, one way or another, by Europe and Japan. In other words, America’s high growth and high standard of living are borrowed, in part, from the rest of the world. Financing this deficit has generally been easy, thanks not least to the international role of the dollar. But European Monetary Union (EMU), with its emerging euro, creates

in Limiting institutions?

politics and notes that we need to think more deeply about the models of ‘reflexivity’ that lead to activism. 56 While she sees promise in tools offered by cultural studies, she also recognises the need to move into ‘wider’ and more ‘messy’ terrain to explore how ‘alternative economies elicit affectual investments (or not)’. 57 Thus, to understand how and when media cultures support a global humanitarianism for distant children

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
New threats, institutional adaptations

the norms and rules of European statecraft, Eurasia will remain a source of instability for the Atlantic security community. Stability in Eurasia – as in eastern and southern Europe – remains dependent upon a stable economic and military environment, but in much less favourable circumstances. Unlike eastern and southern Europe, however, it is likely that the transitions to democracy and the market economy will remain generally intractable owing to unfavourable economic, cultural, ethnic and political factors domestically and a competitive military-strategic calculus

in Limiting institutions?

Foreign Ministry teams. Russian officials have used the FSU states’ heavy reliance on Russian fuel, among other dependencies, to influence those states’ actions. Meanwhile, international economic conditions have complicated the efforts of FSU states both to distance themselves fully from Russia and to build extensive commercial – and security – ties with the more advanced western economies. Destabilising conflicts or political instability in selected areas (e.g., Caucasus, Tajikistan and Transdniestria) have significantly complicated the policy choices of involved

in Limiting institutions?