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Continuous theatre for a creative city

beneficiary and agent of an official narrative that newly turns the Naves into a public space for an aspiring creative city. The Naves’ (and the island’s) discursive, embodied, and architectural reconfiguration as both public space and work space dialectically sustains and is sustained by the economic shift from heavy industry to cultural industry. The debates and negotiations that rescript the Naves simultaneously construct the discursive and material conditions of possibility for Nantes’ creative economy. This chapter 140 Working memories explains how, in the twenty

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Working memories

Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space explores how street theatre transforms industrial space into postindustrial space. Deindustrializing communities have increasingly turned to cultural projects to commemorate industrial heritage while simultaneously generating surplus value and jobs in a changing economy. Through analysis of French street theatre companies working out of converted industrial sites, this book reveals how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. The book argues, firstly, that deindustrialization and redevelopment rely on the spatial and temporal logics of theatre and performance. Redevelopment requires theatrical events and performative acts that revise, resituate, and re-embody particular pasts. The book proposes working memory as a central metaphor for these processes. The book argues, secondly, that in contemporary France street theatre has emerged as working memory's privileged artistic form. If the transition from industrial to postindustrial space relies on theatrical logics, those logics will manifest differently depending on geographic context. The book links the proliferation of street theatre in France since the 1970s to the crisis in Fordist-Taylorist modernity. How have street theatre companies converted spaces of manufacturing into spaces of theatrical production? How do these companies (with municipal governments and developers) connect their work to the work that occurred in these spaces in the past? How do those connections manifest in theatrical events, and how do such events give shape and meaning to redevelopment? Street theatre’s function is both economic and historiographic. It makes the past intelligible as past and useful to the present.

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Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality

life is made meaningful. Fundamentally enhanced collaboration among natural and social scientists and scholars of human contexts, symbols and meanings would signal the beginning of a new paradigm for addressing the sustainability gap. (Fischer et al. 2007: 623) In this chapter, I argue that the twofold renovation of the concept of sustainability proposed by Fischer et al. invites a deeper questioning of prevailing cultural assumptions, perceptions and values regarding human 52 Deep sustainability 53 identity, aspirations and interrelations with nonhuman

in Literature and sustainability
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Crossing the margins

. Crucially, analysis would also need to engage with the potential for traditional music to create ‘spatial illusions’ (Tuan 1977: 14) – for example, the association (in much contemporary cinematic discourse) of certain instruments with certain landscapes. The methodological economy of politics/poetics has its parallels in other critical and cultural fields. But the real point is that, as this example shows, the spatial imagination might prove beneficial for archipelagic studies. Traditional Irish music could be profitably compared in these terms to other ‘traditional

in Across the margins
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Putting the countryside back to work

-dwellers (often retirees, but also young working people) leave dense urban centres in search of improved quality of life. These ‘neo-rurals’ seek a lower cost of living and proximity to natural green space, but they also tend to relocate to those rural communities that can offer the cultural amenities of a larger city.3 As a result, Corbigny and other small towns in France have begun to use cultural projects to compete in an emerging rural market of place. The discourse Reincorporation 61 of the creative economy – a model in which artists must create jobs, generate revenue

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Working memory

is an exploration of how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. Theatre and performance enable us to make ongoing situations like deindustrialization and redevelopment intelligible as events, to make sense of past and future from within an unfolding present. This is a book about how street theatre reorders spaces and times and how it suggests to its publics ways of navigating the real or imagined transition from one kind of space, time, work, or economy to another. (The phrase ‘real or

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction

9 Waking up in a different place: contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction GLENDA NORQUAY AND GERRY SMYTH In his 1994 essay entitled ‘The lie of the land: some thoughts on the map of Ireland’, the Irish journalist and cultural commentator Fintan O’Toole made the point that although Dublin and Edinburgh are equidistant from the Rhine, the latter city, according to a certain German map of Europe’s new economically defined regions, was part of the core whereas Dublin is part of the outer periphery, simply because Edinburgh is more accessible and richer. In this

in Across the margins
The plays of Ed Thomas and the cultural politics of South Wales

8 Cool enough for Lou Reed?: The plays of Ed Thomas and the cultural politics of South Wales1 SHAUN RICHARDS In the conclusion to his 1985 book When Was Wales? the historian Gwyn A. Williams declared that the Welsh were now ‘nothing but a naked people under an acid rain’ (305). Written in the aftermath of the antidevolution vote of 1979 and the fatal blow delivered to the economy and confidence by the defeat of the 1984 miners’ strike, Williams’s work, for all its tentative faith that some form of Wales will survive, is a litany of loss. Above all it mourns the

in Across the margins
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Precedents to sustainability in nineteenth-century literature and culture

sustainability even has a history is vexed. There is little indication, for example, of historical precedents in the book most often credited with enshrining the principles of sustainability in the environmental movement – E. F. Schumacher’s Small is Beautiful (1973). There’s little or nothing in academic studies of sustainability or, correspondingly, of sustainability in major cultural histories of environmentalism or ecology such as Donald Worster’s Nature’s Economy (1994). Indeed, some of those histories (though not Worster’s) are ambivalent about any nineteenth

in Literature and sustainability
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Culture, criticism, theory since 1990

’ connected the Republic with the ‘tiger’ economies of East Asia. The point, Cleary stresses, is not to find perfect symmetry between Ireland and other former colonies; it is rather ‘to think the ways in which specific national configurations are always the product of dislocating intersections between local and global processes that are not simply random but part of the internally contradictory structure of the modern capitalist world system’.79 This discussion has surveyed the responses within cultural production and cultural criticism to Ireland’s rapid economic

in Irish literature since 1990