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This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

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’s Hour, broadcasting later on Radio Manchester as well. After the death of her second husband she stayed at Rose Hill, turning it into a refuge for unmarried mothers and their babies in the 1960s, and later, in the late 1970s, for Vietnamese refugees. With a national profile, and a job that took her to London frequently, Shapley retained her deep love for Manchester, and particularly Didsbury. This is from her autobiography, published in 1996, three years before her death: A lot of the attractiveness of Didsbury lies in its proximity to the river and its abundance of

in Austerity baby
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1981. Maurice Noar, whom she had married in 1914, had died on 27 February 1969, at the age of eighty-two. His profession is given variously on the documents: Austerity baby [ 95 ] [ 96 ] Maurice and Rebecca Noar Jack, Ralph and Rosabelle Noar Rosabelle Noar Austerity baby as tailor on his marriage certificate (and ‘tailor (master)’ on my mother’s birth certificate), then ‘manager (textile factory) (retired)’ on his death certificate, and ‘commercial traveller (retired)’ where he is named on my grandmother’s death certificate. His father, Joseph Noar, had been

in Austerity baby
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objects simultaneously of benefit and risk. Just as they could animate life and bring vitality, so could they cause suffering and even death: life-threatening burns, electrocution, and miscarriage were all reported in popular and medical literature. The history of home-use lamps bears important relation to that of ‘domesticating’ electricity; both were a haphazard business. As Graeme Gooday showed, domestic lighting occupied a

in Soaking up the rays
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knowledge though. McEnery painted Goossens’s portrait at least twice; one portrait is still in the Eastman School of Music. Several of the people I spoke to – mainly women in their eighties and nineties – remembered McEnery well, especially in her later years, and had fascinating stories to tell about the salon she ran in her house in Goodman Street (bequeathed to the Rochester Museum and Science Center on her death, and now used as the Center’s administrative offices). Belatedly, I came to realise what a fabulous world Rochester must have been in the 1920s, prohibition

in Austerity baby
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of 1945, a year before her death. From her earliest years in politics, initially as a Liverpool City councillor from 1909 to 1935, she had taken up feminist causes, including women’s suffrage, payments to seamen’s wives, pensions for widows and, later, the situation of women and children in India. She was elected to Parliament in 1929 as one of the two MPs for the Combined English Universities (a two-member constituency added in 1918 to give representation to the new provincial universities and lasting until 1950), and was as dedicated and energetic a campaigner on

in Austerity baby
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, scientists. Lafitte, looking back on the internment episode four decades later, starts his ‘afterthoughts’ in this way: The only blessing for which we can thank Britain’s rounding up of its ‘enemy aliens’ in 1940 is that it unintentionally accomplished the genesis of the Amadeus Quartet. After the Second World War this talented and eventually internationally famous group delighted music lovers everywhere for forty years until Peter Schidlof’s death ended the partnership in 1987. For it was in a British internment camp that Schidlof, a youth of eighteen, made friends and

in Austerity baby
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Paris for the first time for nearly twenty years. She had, like Leonie and other relatives, been in Gurs camp, and then been hidden with other children in a convent, eventually being transported through Spain and to Palestine. She grew up there, and remained in Israel until her death in 1997. When she and Claude met in 1957 they no longer had a language in common – she knew only Hebrew. On Sunday 5 June 2016 a ceremony took place in Busenberg to unveil three large information and memorial boards near the Jewish cemetery. They record the earlier Jewish community, and

in Austerity baby
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] In fact, it is not genuine. The narrator of Hans Keilson’s 1959 novel The Death of the Adversary (described as a ‘lost classic’ on its reissue in 2010), is here a young boy, swapping stamps with his friend Fabian. The time is soon after the First World War, the place is Germany. The book records the narrator’s experience of the rise to power of an unnamed ‘adversary’ through the 1930s until he (like the author himself, a German Jew) is obliged to flee to the Netherlands. In this early episode, he had been given a children’s printing outfit for his birthday, and was

in Austerity baby
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accompanying them to the United States. Sylvia had been invited to the Third American Writers’ Conference in New York in June. For Elizabeth Wade White and Evelyn Holahan the quayside encounter was their first meeting. Within a year they were partners, sharing an apartment in New York City. They were together until Evelyn’s death. Although when I met her in Rochester in 2002 Elizabeth Holahan did not mention her sister Evelyn, she herself is mentioned twice in Spinster [ 209 ] [ 210 ] Kathleen McEnery, Portrait of Margaret Holahan Austerity baby [ 211 ] Kathleen

in Austerity baby