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Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange

William Blackstone as a civil death. 27 Gothic scholars such as Ruth Bienstock Anolik and Diana Wallace have taken up Blackstone’s description of women after marriage to argue that conventions such as the imprisonment, starvation, haunting and disappearance of wives at the hands of violent husbands or brothers-in-law reflect this legal non-existence. The twin threats of patriarchy and domesticity to

in Gothic incest
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

becomes a tyrannical and jealous brute, viewing Louisa with intense suspicion and fundamentally contributing to her eventual death from grief and (largely imagined) guilt. The history of Lady Barton thus forcefully suggests that, while Ireland may be a strange and enchanting world, villainy is not native to its soil. The story of Lady Juliana Harley describes a similar passage from the mundane reality of life in London and Bath to the sublime environs of Wales and Ireland. If, in The history of Lady Barton , travel to the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction

-witted cousin, Dick. When she refuses, he sends her to a convent in France, where she endures repeated attacks on her Protestantism, before being eventually freed by her concerned friends. Her release precipitates Woodville's death and frees her from his control. The tale then concludes with Sophia's own ‘true romance’ conclusion: marriage to Stanhope. The convent thus hovers knowingly between the borders of fact and fiction, novel and romance. While it condemns certain reading practices, as exhibited by Woodville and Eleanor, and

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott

– from France. Rather than triumphant processions and tears of joy, William returns to a continuation of the struggles he experienced in France. In his absence, his castle has been invaded by Raymond, nephew of the King of England's corrupt and controlling chief counsel, Hubert; William's wife has been informed of his death, and his young son has been sent away to a secret destination. As William struggles to reach his home, his wife, Ela, is subjected to Raymond's lascivious advances and eventually forcefully dragged to the altar in a sham marriage ceremony

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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mother's marriage (1817), The hut and the castle (1823), and Ethelbert (1830). 8 Like Roche, Cuthbertson was generally viewed as a Radcliffean imitator and, accordingly, has been given short shrift in scholarship of the Romantic period. Yet, also like Roche, Cuthbertson's gothic romances were extremely widely read throughout the nineteenth century, with Cuthbertson remaining a recognisable name long after her death, despite the fact that she published most of her work anonymously. 9 The same might be said of a considerable number

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

her novels originally printed or republished by the notorious Minerva Press established in 1790 by William Lane and headed, from Lane's death in 1814, by A.K. Newman, 8 Roche was arguably at the forefront of the Romantic period's increasing expansion of literary production and dissemination. 9 Thanks, at least in part, to Lane's pioneering development of the circulating library system and his savvy establishment of trade partnerships, Roche saw her novels frequently reprinted and translated on a global scale. Yet, while she published to spectacular international

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest

perceives Osbert. Both women are ‘of the middle stature’ and ‘extremely delicate and elegantly formed’ and Laura, like Mary, has ‘the bloom of her youth … shaded by a soft and pensive melancholy’ (pp. 124–5). Osbert falls in love with the doppelganger of his sexually inaccessible sister. In fact, Mary and Laura are so similar that Osbert, feverish after his near death wounding, mistakes his sister for

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats

travelling with her father before she is orphaned by his death. Madame Cheron, Emily’s paternal aunt and guardian after her parents’ deaths, objects to the Chevalier as unworthy of Emily. Forced to leave France with her aunt, who has married the aristocratic Italian, Montoni, Emily becomes little more than a piece of property Montoni attempts to marry off to the highest bidder in exchange for money to pay

in Gothic incest
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Cousins and the changing status of family

his family and her cousin’s death represents the end of the Mowbray and Montreville family lines. Endogamy is revealed to be a potentially resuscitative force for the family that Emmeline ignores, leaving the family to die out instead. Emmeline’s conflict, regarded as she is by her uncle and his wife as less than kin, is made easier; she can be both the morally impeccable

in Gothic incest
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Female sexual agency and male victims

to take Adeliza to become a nun. 52 He says: ‘“to th’ embattl’d foe I will present this hated form – and welcome be the sabre that leaves no atom of it undefac’d”’ (p. 248). He commits his ‘hated’ and fetishised body – hated for its submission to his mother’s sexual agency and for its likeness to his father that made him the victim of maternal desires – to death by sabre. It is no coincidence that

in Gothic incest