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domestic dissent and a mounting death toll in Vietnam, announced that he would not seek another term in of-fice, 74 and the Republican contender, Richard Nixon, won the presidential election on 5 November that year. On 13 January 1969, Johnson asked Dean to tell Wilson that ‘one of his great comforts had been that he could always count on the UK during any crisis’. He was ‘personally grateful for the warm and effective relations he had always had with

in A ‘special relationship’?
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of the coalition government that had ruled Turkey since April 1999 – a relatively long period for a Turkish executive – and to a new round of general elections, held in early November 2002. The reforms that the Turkish Grand National Assembly adopted in August 2002 are a great leap forward. The death penalty was abolished, Kurdish education, television, and language courses were made legal. Among the adopted fourteen principles of the reform package, the Turkish parliament left the death penalty for times of war only. (No executions have been carried out in Turkey

in Turkey: facing a new millennium

THERE ARE A number of avenues through which the ‘place’ of Indigenous people in Australia can be approached. One fundamental arena of struggle has been over land rights. The approach to rights taken here, however, starts from an account of suffering and sets out to trace the political roots of that suffering. One of the clearest forms of suffering to mark Aboriginal lives in Australia is entrenched and widespread ill-health. Thus, across the Indigenous community, the story is one of premature death, often from diseases associated with

in Human rights and the borders of suffering

the bondsman is a dependent consciousness ‘whose essential nature is simply to live or to be for another’ (Hegel 1977 : 115). Hegel does not explain the provenance of this sudden inequality that is injected into the dialectical unfolding of Geist . Nonetheless, Hegel proceeds to script a life and death struggle between lord and bondsman to be recognized as an independent self

in Recognition and Global Politics
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elected leader of the Liberal Party following the outcome of the general election. 16 December 1949 Parliament Act reduces delaying power of the House of Lords from two years to one year. 6 February 1952 Accession of Queen Elizabeth II, following the death of her father, King George VI, that day. The coronation took place on 2 June 1953. 13 December 1955 Gaitskell

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
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in Carrero Blanco’s government of 1973. When Carrero Blanco was assassinated by terrorists in December 1973, Arias Navarro succeeded him as Prime Minister. He was faced with the difficult task of promoting a gradual political liberalisation to ensure a peaceful transfer of executive power from the failing Franco to King Juan Carlos. He was reappointed by King Juan Carlos after Franco’s death in 1975 but the King was

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
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with the outside world. Despite UN resolutions, it made sense to call East Timor ‘one of the world’s great secrets’ and to register the sharp disproportion between the scale of deaths in the territory as a consequence of Indonesian annexation – estimated as proportionately comparable to Cambodia under Pol Pot – and the largely ambiguous and restrained international reaction (Pilger, 1994: 1). Public discussion of occupied East Timor in Western states often cast it as a simple issue. The fact of the suffering of the East Timorese was simple. The

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
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Turkey and Iran found themselves supporting opposite sides in the early 1990s Azeri–Armenian war over the Nagorno–Karabakh enclave: Shi’ite Muslim Iran was siding with Christian Armenia, Turkey supported Azerbaijan. The area became a battlefield for possession between Armenians and Azeris as Soviet power crumbled in the late 1980s, after independence from Moscow rule. In 1991 Nagorno–Karabakh, an Armenian enclave inside neighboring Azerbaijan, unilaterally declared independence from Azerbaijan. The war that erupted caused at least 30,000 deaths and created a million

in Turkey: facing a new millennium
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enclaves of military bases, defended by armor and artillery and yet was powerless to protect people still collaborating with them. Bakers discovered delivering bread to an army base were put to death by the PKK. Fuel stations serving the authorities were set alight and the owners killed. State institutions such as Turkish Airlines, for example, have been closely guarded, operating, in effect, out of fortresses. At nightfall, virtually all semblance of Turkish rule vanished: the PKK ruled the roost. Inhabitants were required to pay taxes to the PKK, on pain of death. Many

in Turkey: facing a new millennium

who makes a republican politics of liberty and agonistic deliberation possible. The ‘struggle for recognition’ contains then, from the beginning, an ‘international’ dimension, as one outcome of ancient war was the possible humiliation of a formerly free citizen-soldier being captured and then sold into slavery. In this sense, the struggle to the death is the choice of a form of

in Recognition and Global Politics