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Managing the criminal facets of war economies
Jenny H. Peterson

control? One of the cornerstones of liberalism, the rule of law is seen as essential in the development of prosperous, just and liberal societies (Peterson, 2010). Stable and impartial security services and judiciaries, based on democratic principles and a belief in universal human rights, are central to explanations regarding the pacific nature of liberal societies. However, while these liberal systems are often presented in this positive, peace-supporting light, other streams of analysis allude to a much more problematic side of this technology of liberalism. In

in Building a peace economy?
Current policy options and issues
Jenny H. Peterson

which have become a defining feature of the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). 16 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 17 War economy transformation: policy issues A related cluster of targeted policies, which can broadly be referred to as resource governance initiatives, are also central to transformation. Including privatisation, anti-corruption/transparency programmes and resource-sharing mechanisms, this body of reforms seeks to improve public and private management systems related to resources, thus preventing them from

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Liberal reform and the creation of new conflict economies
Jenny H. Peterson

be seen as part of the wider political project of liberalising former communist and socialist economies. As Estrin notes, privatisation has ensured the ‘irreversibility of the reform process’ (1994: 18) as it has replaced a ruling class of authoritarian-communists with democratic-capitalists. Privatisation is a key tool in keeping communists, socialists and actors with leftist sympathies out of power and keeping regimes friendly to the developed liberal nations in control of transitioning states. Batt agrees with these assessments, concluding that economic policy

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours
Jenny H. Peterson

formal models imposed by the international community. There is also an ethical argument to be had related to the hypocrisy involved in some attempts by DSI actors to install such modes of governance. The DSI in fact uses techniques that contradict their own values and standards in order to bring post-conflict states and economies in line with the ideal liberal form of political-economy. They have broken their own guidance on judicial independence, democratic decision making and transparency. In this sense, transformation policies are in fact counterproductive to the

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
David Owen

democracy is a form of government that appeals to an idea of popular sovereignty and, hence, an answer to the question ‘who rules?’ – but to flesh out this answer will very quickly mire us in controversy. This point is of more than merely academic interest for two reasons. First, how we understand the concept of democracy guides our practical reflections on how to design or reform democratic institutions, it generates criteria

in Political concepts
Open Access (free)
Welfare reform and the ‘Third Way’ politics of New Labour and the New Democrats
Stephen Driver

to exclude more progressive policy reforms on family poverty, opportunities in the labour market and social inclusion. Indeed, the ‘new paternalism’ in New Labour’s Third Way, rather than being the thin end of a conservative wedge, may in fact help to sustain social democratic values and egalitarian public policy-making – not undermine them. There is, after all, room for

in The Third Way and beyond
Armando Barrientos and Martin Powell

the most secure and sustainable way out of poverty; and the balancing of rights and responsibilities. Giddens 20 suggests a ‘Third Way programme’ including the new democratic state, active civil society, the democratic family, the new mixed economy, equality as inclusion, positive welfare and the social investment state. White’s 21 themes include: the state as guarantor, not

in The Third Way and beyond
Paul Cammack

-speak) ‘market-friendly’ institutions. The ‘capitalistic communitarianism’ identified by David Morrison ( chapter 9 , this volume) as informing Blair’s understanding of citizenship provides this programme with ideological support. If that is so, to describe such elements of the programme as the New Deal as fitting with ‘a progressive social democratic agenda on welfare reform’, as Driver

in The Third Way and beyond
New polity dynamics
Dimitris N. Chryssochoou, Michael J. Tsinisizelis, Stelios Stavridis and Kostas Ifantis

Russia, mainly owing to the eastward enlargement of NATO and of the Union itself with the possible inclusion of populations of ethnic Russian origin, mainly in Latvia and Estonia, were singled out for improvement, as were those with the Balkan countries that have signed association agreements with the Union. The latter, provided that it does not repeat the CFSP fiasco of the Yugoslav civil war, can become a stabilising force in the wider area, as these countries are actively seeking to become its members. The democratic reform process in these countries, currently in

in Theory and reform in the European Union
David Morrison

is ‘beyond tradition’ and which requires new responsibilities to meet the demands of new risks. 11 However, there are elements of Giddens’s account that are lacking in Blair’s. One is Giddens’s stress on the importance of equality. He argues that ‘[a] democratic society that generates large-scale inequality is likely to produce widespread disaffection and conflict’. 12 Giddens

in The Third Way and beyond