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Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

, the topography has changed. Although the land is forever changing its form, the sea, I thought, is immutable. Thus began my travels back through time to the ancient seas of the world. (Sugimoto, 2010: 109) Such a search for the unchanging marks Sugimoto’s oeuvre, and highlights a curious desire to point the camera, a tool capable of preserving the fleeting instant, 118 Stitching memories Figure 5.2  Hiroshi Sugimoto, Seascape: North Atlantic Ocean, Cape Breton, 1996 © Hiroshi Sugimoto (courtesy of Pace Gallery). This figure has not been made available under a

in Time for mapping

today are to some degree and in some respects underdeveloped. They contain features derived from earlier stages of development which obscure the pure logic of the industrialization process’ Amoore_Global_02_Ch1 17 6/19/02, 12:07 PM Globalisation contested 18 (Kerr et al., 1962: 33). Social change is characterised in periods or epochs of social arrangements that prevail until external conditions dictate that they undergo further transformation. The disciplinary dynamic of the process is reinforced by a presumed desire for modernisation that ultimately drives out

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Mapping times

designed to cater to temporal desires: ‘slidable’ Google Street View images, ‘dynamic’ in-train maps and ‘rapid response’ crisis management tools. These digital mapping transformations are no longer merely possible, they are to be expected. Far from the science fiction of Back to the Future, they are mere technological facts. Some have tentatively called this emergent landscape the ‘post-digital’ (Andersen, Cox and Papadopolous, 2014; Berry and Dieter, 2015), not only to account for the truism that digital software, platforms, apps and services comprise ‘the everyday

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Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

system. The lens of ­asynchronicity – taken From real-time city to asynchronicity 247 here as indicating a consecutive order of separate phases – helps us to question the veracity of what is being measured and displayed by contextualising every step along the way as a situation. For instance, in gathering data, we must pay attention to the fact that experiences, desires and behaviours can vary widely in time, e.g. between day and night and between the seasons. Generic cookiecutter algorithms trigger instant action without taking temporal situatedness into account

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Back to the future

than material realities, the fact remains that they drive a host of actually existing projects and initiatives, many of which are subsumed at present under the ‘big data’ umbrella embodying a ‘capture all’ mentality and desiring an ‘anticipate it all’ future. Perhaps more than anything else, Driesser’s intervention seeks to establish the coordinates for this new future-oriented world and as a clarion call for a political consideration of temporalities. Conclusion: back to the future 265 The authors of (in)formalising have focused not only on the inherent

in Time for mapping

initiator; but he neither creates from nothing nor does he move in the turbid void of his own desires and dreams … What ‘ought to be’ is therefore concrete; indeed it is the only realistic and historicist interpretation of reality, it alone is history in the making and philosophy in the making, it alone is politics. (Gramsci, 1971: 172) The contests and bargains over what ‘ought to be’, in the sense of the shape of a historical bloc or how society should be organised or reorganised are, thus, for Gramsci and his IPE interpreters, the essence of politics. For a study such

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). But the earlier sensation of smug amusement is an isolated one; Bergson provides the cold water: it may, perchance, have happened to you, when seated in a railway carriage … to hear travellers relating to one another stories which must have been comic to them, for they laughed heartily. Had you been one of their company, you would have laughed like them; but, as you were not, you had no desire whatever to do so. (Bergson, 2008: 11) Onwards. Nodes, ways and relations 35 LONG. 0° 38’ 11” E; LAT. 51° 47’ 55” N Figure 2.5  Author GPS track (author’s image). ‘I

in Time for mapping
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The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

5 The ‘contested’ firm: the restructuring of work and production in the international political economy no involuntary changes have ever spontaneously restructured or reorganised a mode of production; … changes in productive relationships are experienced in social and cultural life, refracted in men’s ideas and their values, and argued through in their actions, their choices and their beliefs. (Thompson, 1976/1994: 222) T he desire to comprehend, order and manage the dual dynamics of globalisation and restructuring has led to much attention being paid to the

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The restructuring of work in Britain

’ flexibility that may be a desire of working parents (Hewitt, 1993). At one extreme the sense of time is governed entirely by the slave-master, while at the other the sense of time is expressed by the worker in terms of the demands of their own experiences and Amoore_Global_04_Ch3 80 6/19/02, 12:19 PM Producing hyperflexibility: work in Britain 81 everyday workplace and household lives. In this ambiguity there lies considerable space for social tensions and political contestation. The British governmental making of ‘hyperflexibility’ asserts a duality of strategies for

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