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Irish drama since 1990

produced between the 1960s and the 1980s was notable for its self-consciousness, written by ‘agnostic believers and uneasy patriots, reluctant farmers and local cosmopolitans, incredulous parents and recalcitrant, elderly children, citizens of a country not always identical to the one of their imaginations’.11 Kilroy’s generation of playwrights – Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, Hugh Leonard and Tom MacIntyre – emerged at the beginning of a long second wave of engaged and engaging Irish drama (following the first wave at the beginning of the twentieth century). In the 1980s they

in Irish literature since 1990
Critical and historical contexts of the Lord Mayor’s Show

Pageantry and power and retain it . . . [R]enaissance cities, though powerful communities jealous of their own jurisdiction, were constantly negotiating their relationships with other secular and religious authorities.72 The ‘display’ of power that Johnston cites, in particular, is central to what the Shows were all about, and in London’s case the ‘secular authority’ with which it was the most engaged, in various ways, was the Crown. At the height of its power and influence the City of London, as an entity itself and in its constituent parts – the livery companies and

in Pageantry and power
Sustainability in Kim Stanley Robinson’s Science in the Capital trilogy

fictional worlds, for which adherence to facts or truth (relative to our understanding of the physical laws of the universe or the present constitution of elements of the ‘real world’) is not a useful measure for thinking about the mode; the predictions that futures studies posits, however, can be productively assessed in terms of their veracity and efficacy for risk assessment. Butler and Williamson accede to what is frequently reiterated in sf scholarship and fandom: that sf is not meant as prediction. Ian Miles, for instance, notes that while many sf writers have

in Literature and sustainability
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New generation Northern Irish poets (Sinéad Morrissey and Nick Laird)

curious enough to reach for something beyond the quotidian and parochial, capable of engaging with the strange and the sublime. Laird, like Morrissey, proves to be deeply engaged by the relationship between family and identity, conscious both of the need to belong and to break rank.22 Something of this anxiety can be seen in ‘The Layered’, one of To a Fault’s lighter offerings. This finds the poet playing games with his name and depicting, somewhat cryptically, three family members. First up is Matthew Thomas or, as the poem has it, ‘Empty Laird’ (p. 28), a man who in

in Irish literature since 1990

those qualities and values that are required for the advancement of sciences and those needed for political success.13 While in his works on the pursuit of greatness Bacon stresses the importance of a large armed populace engaged in regular warfare, he frequently emphasises that the advancement of learning demands peace, international co-operation and the absence of religious controversy.14 Rather than reading Bacon’s wide-ranging writings into an unhappily homogeneous unity, it is better to think of each work as making a different and specific intervention into a

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis

laid the foundation of Bacon’s reputation. He was widely celebrated after his death for the power of his message about the importance of studying the natural world. From the middle years of the seventeenth century in England, through the eighteenth-century French encyclopédistes and nineteenth-century English Baconians like William Whewell, to twentieth-century scholarship, Bacon has been held up – with good cause – as one of the pre-eminent intellectual patrons of natural science.2 The New Atlantis is an important document in this reception history, for it was often

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
The Show from street to print

ascertain, what the relationship of the printed text to the actual event tended to be.5 These mostly unanswered – even largely unasked – questions reflect another important aspect of the Shows where scholarship has let us down. Even Peter Blayney excludes ‘all masques, pageants and entertainments’ from his account of printed playbooks, on the basis that the former were not really plays.6 Blayney’s view, which is not atypical, is part of the problem, for as hybrid cultural productions the Shows do not fit neatly into any of the categories habitually used within literary

in Pageantry and power

& please my selfe, make an Utopia of mine owne, a new Atlantis, a poeticall commonwealth of mine owne, in which I will freely domineere, build Citties, make Lawes, Statutes, as I list my selfe. And why may I not?7 Price_02_Ch2 29 14/10/02, 9:19 am 30 Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis The reference to ‘a new Atlantis’ did not appear until the 1628 edition of Anatomy of Melancholy; in 1621 Burton began only by evoking Utopia as the poetical commonwealth. In the year following the publication of the New Atlantis, Burton, as was his habit, engaged in the process of

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera

, especially perhaps in Africa, national selfawareness in fiction, if not the concept of the nation itself, has undergone significant shifts and revisions. In consequence, as was intimated in the previous chapter, writers acting out of both disillusionment and cynicism have come round to concentrating on the imaginative as opposed to the actual status of the nation. The constructedness of the nation is now engaged as an issue and, BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 141 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera 141

in Stories of women
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Ezra Pound

Modern poet, building into twentieth-century poetry a defining mobility of expression and action. On the other hand, in re-evaluating the poet’s vocation, in his even contemplating ‘vocation’, he engaged in lines of thought which ran freely to fanaticism, and which produced a confidence that when turned to hatred resulted in unstoppable and unspeakable prejudice. And what has to be emphasized is that these two aspects of Pound’s enthusiasm are, in him, deeply interlinked. So while in this book he is presented as a necessary development between the circulatory

in Enthusiast!