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Steve Sohmer

the Universe, had been debarred from performing in public. Everyone in that cold basement shared the everyday experience of living in a dictatura. And many knew the text to which the song referred: Investigations of a Dog (1922) by Franz Kafka, in which a dog tries to understand by logic and ‘science’ the mysteries of life to which other dogs seem oblivious. Mr. K’s dog

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

I’ve suggested that in As You Like It Shakespeare etched into Touchstone an effigy of Thomas Nashe. I will show that in Twelfth Night Shakespeare produced another, more highly developed portrait of Nashe as Feste – and thrust him back into conflict with his real-life nemesis Gabriel Harvey, whom Shakespeare cast as Malvolio – ‘He who

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

early modern identity. 47 Although art historians have engaged with material culture and especially the ‘everydaylife of the early modern English household, few literary scholars concerned with plays and the visual arts take into account the critical advances presented by these studies. 48 Critical opportunities are often missed as a result, because early modern English playwrights are themselves

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Chloe Porter

(1617), and worked on the set for James Shirley’s masque The Triumphs of Peace , performed at the Middle Temple in 1633. 10 Buckett’s versatility was not unusual in this period. Life as what might be termed a ‘visual artist’ in early modern London seems to have often involved a variety of types of work in collaborative contexts. The painter John De Critz produced

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Theory and Spenserian practice
Rachel E. Hile

Chauntecleer’s pride; instead, it delineates his character in a way that motivates his susceptibility to the flattery of the fox, Russell. Both Chauntecleer and Russell are susceptible to flattery because they prize themselves too highly, as though they really are courtiers, but both remain for readers simply animals. The explicit moral to courtly readers (“Allas, ye lordes, many a fals flatour / Is in youre courtes / … / Beth war, ye lordes, of hir trecherye,” Chaucer, Nun’s Priest, lines 3325–26, 3330) invites readers to apply the lessons of the fable to real life. Yet

in Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

course of his life. I argue that, despite the variety of his literary output and the multiplicity of sources and influences to which he was indebted, Middleton uses these varied means to express what is a remarkably stable set of religious and political orientations. Middleton’s early political and religious sympathies In examining Middleton’s political and religious ideas, we see consistency over his lifetime in his commitment to reformist Protestantism; what changes is the way he expresses this mindset. Middleton enters the print scene in the 1590s, and his praise of

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

as part of rituals designed to protect buildings and their occupants from evil spirits. 33 There is no contemporary documentation about this practice, a fact that Dinah Eastop speculates may be partly because secrecy added to the efficacy of any protective magic activated by the concealment. 34 Veiled in secrecy, suppression and controversy in early modern life, talismanic

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama