Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • everyday life x
  • International Relations x
  • Manchester International Relations x
Clear All
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

Emergency Medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of seeking innovation in medical humanitarianism but advocates to aim for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday practice at home. In this, Tony is also critical of the term ‘humanitarian space’, as it by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada and Róisín Read

, Humanitarian Policy Group ( London : Overseas Development Institute ). Duffield , M. ( 2010 ), ‘ Risk-Management and the Fortified Aid Compound: Everyday Life in Post-Interventionary Society ’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding , 4 : 4 , 453 – 74 . Fast , L. ( 2014 ), Aid in Danger: The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

looking on that the catastrophe has been contained . It is a kind of quarantine effect, whereby what frightens observers is the idea of uncontrolled, ongoing, unpredictable suffering. Humanitarians arrive to create a moment of ‘new normal’ where the flow has been stemmed, the hole plugged. The Ebola response is an example of this – the vast cost in life and suffering and the everyday life experiences of West Africans in the communities affected are all but invisible now because the breach was contained. What normal does is obscure and disguise

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

), ‘ Biosensing in Context: Health Privacy in a Connected World ’, in Nafus , D. (ed.), Quantified: Biosensing Technologies in Everyday Life ( Cambridge, MA : MIT Press ), pp. 79 – 100 . OCHA ( 2013 ), Humanitarianism in the Network Age: Including World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2012 , https

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

opens the chapter describing Australia as a country in which the use of digital technology is part of everyday life for most people. This situation can be construed as a scenario in which both human and non-human actors establish a network, characterised by symmetry between the social and the technical ( Latour, 1999 , 2005 ). Leung relies on actor–network theory to reject the binary conceptualisation of humans and technology. The analytical power of actor–network theory is, however

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

practical and focused on everyday life, with thoughtful and humanistic ambitions. The projects were based on a simple idea: not to construct new shelters but to improve the empty office buildings that lay empty across Vienna after the financial crash. The walls of the bright white pavilion were illustrated with simple photographs, quotations and publications describing the approach, transforming dull grey offices into liveable accommodation by focusing on furniture and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

is completely able to subject or subvert the other (1988: 217). This is not dissimilar to Scott’s conceptualisation of the pose, nor to Certeau’s notion of trickery. Mbembe also reminds us that ‘the ways in which societies compose and invent themselves in the present – what we could call the creativity of practice – is always ahead of the knowledge we can ever produce about them’ (Weaver Shipley 2010: 654, emphasis in the original). Any practice of resistance has to be understood as embedded in the practice of everyday life, without reducing 184 Resistance and

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
A view from below
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

throughout the social sciences, and especially from critical theorists, to connect the micro-dynamics of daily life with macro structures and processes, even as a way of embodying them (Bleiker 2000; Davies and Niemann 2009; Enloe 1989; Marchand 2000; Tickner 2005; Wilcox 2015). In peace and conflict studies, ‘practices’ and ‘everydayness’ have always been the epistemological choice. The emergence of peace and conflict was already a kind of ‘everyday turn’ against the focus of strategic studies of the 1960s and 1970s. In the 1980s, authors such as Andrew Mack, David Dunn

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Open Access (free)
Resistance and the liberal peace: a missing link
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

resistance and state-making as a set of practices. Practices are understood, following Certeau and Scott, as a representation of the practical ways of dealing with the experience of domination in everyday life, as well as a reflection of millenarian practices of subordinate classes. Practices are the mechanisms, informalities and improvisations that allow for certain schemes to be put ‘in practice’ (Scott 1998: 6). Adler and Pouliot identify five characteristics that clearly convey this meaning. Practices: (1) are a ‘performance’, which is the doing or making of something

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

5 Everyday violence and Mai Mai militias in Eastern DRC What would you do if the state was a man? I’ll kill him.1 A From words to weapons lthough there were skirmishes, especially throughout the 1990s, Chapter 3 has already exposed how the first phase of the conflict was the defining moment in which the armed mobilisation of subordinate classes took place. The fact that the AFDL war was conducted under the guise of a national liberation movement and led by Laurent-Désiré Kabila succeeded in reviving the Mai Mai historical sentiment of fighting against

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making