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Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard

(the treasure cave and exit). McClintock reads this as an allegory of the ‘genesis of racial and sexual order’ (p. 241), in which the heroes travel across a hostile and temporarily castrating female body to the mineral wealth of the mines and once there perform ‘an extraordinary fantasy of male birthing, culminating in the regeneration of white manhood’ (p. 248). One would never know from McClintock’s account that Haggard constructs this feminised landscape as beautiful and on occasion sublime.6 And that instead of unremitting hostility, the land offers the

in Postcolonial contraventions

serves as an example of how the regulatory fantasy of the couple mother-child dyad operates in a context in which the developmental trajectory is fixed and determined. As with many young girls, the writer depicts here how she dreamt of marriage and children, linking these fantasies to ultimate forms of self-fulfillment. Such examples certify a deterministic life plan with a developmental, linear trajectory, one in which finding a husband and having children are seen as obligatory milestones. According to this view, marriage and parenthood are integral to the life

in A table for one
The tragedy (and comedy) of accelerated modernisation

insatiable and impossible to fulfil and end in death and catastrophe. The nativists who search for the vestiges of traditional Ireland – the imaginary ‘Real Ireland’19 – represent Faust’s incarnation as the Lover, who romanticises and yearns for a lost innocence. But the Real Ireland of the postcard is the Lacanian ‘Real’: the void in the symbolic order of modern Ireland, into which the lover projects his own romantic fantasy, and through pursuing the fantasy of the Real, succeeds only in destroying the imagined thing he thought he loved. Irish incarnations of the

in The end of Irish history?
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Association and distinction in politics and religion

secluded activity which sustained the public work of kingship, but was distinct from it. This was not an eccentricity of a single English king, but a universal feature of rulers and elites of all kinds. A similar function appears to have been served by a small album of paintings on silk of the Yongzheng Emperor in early eighteenth-century China. The pictures were not for public display, but presented the emperor, to himself, in a range of guises and situations of varying fantasy, but each representing an aspect of human worth, skill, dignity, heroism, or authority. 19

in Cultivating political and public identity
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The imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness

the river into a snake that charms him, and he in turn becomes a ‘silly little bird’ (p. 67). Marlow’s own consuming desire is projected on to the object of his gaze; he becomes the imaginary object of consumption. He fetishises both Africa and the image of himself as a consumer. Marlow’s choice is not only that of the desperate unemployed, then, but that of the greedy consumer. The pursuit of his boyhood fantasy is, inevitably, infantilising; Marlow has to compromise his adult autonomy and become in effect the simulated boy of his fantasy, turning to his aunt for

in Postcolonial contraventions

, citizenship – even for the ‘good citizen’ – is not a natural and secured right: it is always a contingent relationship between a state and an individual, held open and differentiated along lines including race, class, gender, sexuality, disability and employment status (Anderson, 2013 ). Anderson also argues that the recent waves of anti-immigrant hostility have relied on notions of a ‘fantasy citizenship’, in which new ‘rights

in Go home?
Open Access (free)

attention has almost fetishised the spectacular Kurtz, and ‘his’ Africa, minimising their systemic relations with European capitalist bureaucracy in Europe. It is important to extend criticism by examining how overseas domination is rendered in the textures of ordinary European metropolitan life, labour and leisure in the novella. And equally important is the way metropolitan political power, consumerism and fantasy are seen to control the Company’s African employment structures, just as they control Kurtz up to his death. When viewed from this angle, Conrad’s critique

in Postcolonial contraventions

world boundlessly with its own content. 98 The content of antisemitism is filled with ‘fantasies of Jewish crimes, infanticide and sadistic excess, poisoning of the nation and international conspiracy’. While these fantasies go back a long way, what was new to the Nazi period was their ‘practical implementation’ which ‘goes beyond the evil content of the projection’. 99 Nazism was a ‘special case of

in Antisemitism and the left
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, emphasis in original). In retelling their childhoods, the Mavericks affirm their values and pride in their (sporting) heritage. Their stories spill into tales of poverty, creativity, perseverance and community cohesion. Hall reminds us that the past is “always constructed through memory, fantasy, narrative, and myth” ( 2003 , p. 237). The Mavericks’ stories of their pasts may not all be true, but they

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)

“to come along” and “making him stay” complement the cultural image of a “prince charming” or the “knight in shining armor.” Waiting, in this sense, connotes excitement, delight, and fantasy. Even the new modalities of love, in which women exercise more choice in choosing their partners (Swidler 2003), stress the centrality of waiting for “the right one” and looking for one’s soul mate.1 In her analysis of the love stories section on Match.com, Sharon Mazzarella contends that many of the success stories published on the site “tell the tale of individuals who have

in A table for one