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Analysing the example of data territorialisation

) National routing is not to be compared to actual censorship, but the general legitimation of governmental intervention and the technological changes that give more opportunities for control prepare the grounds for censorship. Furthermore, the rough consensus of global data mobility and availability is challenged and nationality of data and the protection of its security by steering the network becomes

in Security/ Mobility

the local, regional or global levels or at their intersection. The UN’s evolving governance function, however, does not fit neatly into traditional frameworks of governance. Rather it assumes complex territorial as well as non-territorial qualities, and proceeds on the basis of painfully difficult normative ‘resolutions’ or, at least, ‘syntheses’ that constantly interact with changing power

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Problematising the normative connection

d’être . Although the UN is at the centre of much empirical and normative research, its possibly evolving relationship to the wider international value system remains largely under-explored. More notably, despite the radical changes in the global political setting and in the UN’s scope of activities over the years, what exactly the UN stands for is not all that clear. We do know that the UN has a vast

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change

of the First and Second World Wars led to a growing acknowledgement that the nature and process of international governance would have to change’. 83 Perhaps the choice, then, is either to wait passively for the next titanic catastrophe which is likely to come in one form or another, or to begin building a parallel and more efficient and democratic global system than the UN. In the latter case, we can at

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Lessons for critical security studies?

–22. Harvey, D., 1990. The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change , Cambridge/Oxford: Blackwell. Harvey, D., 2006. Spaces of Global Capitalism. Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development , London: Verso. Huysmans, J., 2014. Security Unbound: Enacting Democratic Limits , London: Routledge. Jeandesboz, J., 2014

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order

‘coming anarchy’ (Robert Kaplan), asking ‘Must it be the West against the rest?’ (Matthew Connelly and Paul Kennedy), or predicting a ‘clash of civilisations’ (Samuel Huntington). 1 When the United States proposed, in the early 1990s, to establish a new world order, it became clear that this new vision of the West’s undisputed global leadership was too ambitious; this new world order was interpreted by many as just the

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds

T HE UN’S RESPONSE to intra-state conflicts did not take shape in a vacuum. International normative preferences which had an impact on active UN involvement in intra-state conflicts drew their inspiration from and interacted with the international political milieu. No doubt the wider historical context in which the UN had to operate underwent constant change, as did

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Open Access (free)
Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

M OBILITY TODAY is regarded as both a condition of global modernity and as a source of insecurity. Not only are people on the move every day and on an unprecedented scale, but also a multiplicity of non-humans move and are being moved. Indeed, ‘from SARS and avian influenza to train crashes, from airport expansion controversies to controlling global warming, from urban congestion charging to

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
A European fin de siècle

endowed with greater pluralism, freedom of choice and multi-culturalism. Old national totalities are giving way to transnational ones; discourses of power are changing location but not the mode of operation. Or, rather, the discourse of power has become a-local (global) and a-topic (Utopian). It is neither good nor bad: it is the ‘thin air’ air of postmodernity, and it is not in our power to change the

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
The analytical framework

multilateral evolution and the related question global governance’ through the method of historical structures, 6 his study has also an explicit prescriptive quality. It places the UN as an organisation in the broader context of the evolution of multilateralism (understood as a deep organising principle which may have several concrete manifestations – institutions), pays

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change