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Analysing the example of data territorialisation

) National routing is not to be compared to actual censorship, but the general legitimation of governmental intervention and the technological changes that give more opportunities for control prepare the grounds for censorship. Furthermore, the rough consensus of global data mobility and availability is challenged and nationality of data and the protection of its security by steering the network becomes

in Security/ Mobility
Lessons for critical security studies?

–22. Harvey, D., 1990. The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change , Cambridge/Oxford: Blackwell. Harvey, D., 2006. Spaces of Global Capitalism. Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development , London: Verso. Huysmans, J., 2014. Security Unbound: Enacting Democratic Limits , London: Routledge. Jeandesboz, J., 2014

in Security/ Mobility
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Security/ Mobility and politics of movement

M OBILITY TODAY is regarded as both a condition of global modernity and as a source of insecurity. Not only are people on the move every day and on an unprecedented scale, but also a multiplicity of non-humans move and are being moved. Indeed, ‘from SARS and avian influenza to train crashes, from airport expansion controversies to controlling global warming, from urban congestion charging to

in Security/ Mobility
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Surveillance and transgender bodies in a post-9/ 11 era of neoliberalism

recent legislative changes This brings me to larger questions around surveillance, security, mobility, state power, citizenship, and gender non-normativity. While border crossings are indeed rife with pitfalls for gender-nonconforming and transgender populations, there has simultaneously been a relative abundance of recent global state-based legislative and policy-level changes

in Security/ Mobility
Data becoming risk information

, the homeomorphism of data. Homeomorphism refers to how data changes form as it moves across space or as it is transmitted. Transmission and homeomorphism refer overall then to how data accounts for a set of material entities whose form changes as it is processed through different organisational stages on its trajectory towards becoming information that can lead to the instantiation of anticipatory

in Security/ Mobility
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: Paradigms Press, 2008); L. Tsaliki, C. A. Frangonikolopoulos and A. Huliaras (eds), Transnational Celebrity Activism in Global Politics: Changing the World? (Bristol: Intellect, 2011). 13 See the more recent cases of US involvement in Somalia and Bosnia, in J. Western, ‘Sources of Humanitarian Intervention: Beliefs, Information, and Advocacy in the US Decisions on Somalia and Bosnia’, International Security

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century

, with the ‘Aryans’ as the master race. Such racist views were lent greater credibility with the advent of social Darwinism. 21 The Asians, Africans and native Americans were regarded ‘inferior races’, with the so-called ‘white race’ superior intellectually, culturally and otherwise. 22 The idea of progress, coupled with the standard of civilization, provided the European powers with a handy justification for their global expansion. 23 From the 1830s onwards

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Ontological coordination and the assessment of consistency in asylum requests

-Boucher et al. 2014 ; Maguire et al. 2014 ). As a positive spin-off from these arguments, instead of studying the functioning of the border, we are now used to talking about how the work of bordering is performed (Johnson et al. 2011 ; Côté- Boucher et al. 2014 ; Maguire et al. 2014 ) . Border ing , not borde rs anymore: a minor change in phrasing, but one that captures a lot. For at stake in...these few extra keystrokes is a

in Security/ Mobility

in Israel. In spite of the changes that borders have undergone with the development of new technologies (Bigo 2004 ; Ceyhan 2004 ; Dillon 2007 ) and despite the calls in the literature to move ‘beyond territoriality’ (McNevin 2014 ), the Israeli case thus suggests that the imaginary of the border as a protection against outsiders, as a way of reclaiming sovereignty and reasserting identity remains central to the

in Security/ Mobility

International Law in Britain, occupant of the newly created Chichele Chair of International Law and Diplomacy at Oxford University, is hard to pinpoint. In a lecture at All Souls College at Oxford University on the principle of non-intervention, he argued against intervention, referring extensively to Mamiani’s arguments. 42 But then he made an about-face by distinguishing between ‘rebellion’ and ‘revolt’, defining the former as successful change of government or dynasty and the

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century