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The acceleration of interest in Baldwin’s work and impact since 2010 shows no signs of diminishing. This resurgence has much to do with Baldwin—the richness and passionate intensity of his vision—and also something to do with the dedicated scholars who have pursued a variety of publication platforms to generate further interest in his work. The reach of Baldwin studies has grown outside the academy as well: Black Lives Matter demonstrations routinely feature quotations from Baldwin; Twitter includes a “Son of Baldwin” site; and Raoul Peck’s 2016 documentary, I Am Not Your Negro, has received considerable critical and popular interest. The years 2010–13 were a key period in moving past the tired old formula—that praised his early career and denigrated the works he wrote after 1963—into the new formula—positing Baldwin as a misunderstood visionary, a wide-reaching artist, and a social critic whose value we are only now beginning to appreciate. I would highlight four additional prominent trends that emerged between 2010 and 2013: a consideration of Baldwin in the contexts of film, drama, and music; understandings of Baldwin globally; Baldwin’s criticism of American institutions; and analyses of Baldwin’s work in conversation with other authors.

James Baldwin Review
Art, authorship and activism

This book charts and analyses the work of Oliver Stone – arguably one of the foremost political filmmakers in Hollywood during the last thirty years. Drawing on previously unseen production files from Oliver Stone’s personal archives and hours of interviews both with Stone and a range of present and former associates within the industry, the book employs a thematic structure to explore Stone’s life and work in terms of war, politics, money, love and corporations. This allows the authors both to provide a synthesis of earlier and later film work as well as locate that work within Stone’s developing critique of government. The book explores the development of aesthetic changes in Stone’s filmmaking and locates those changes within ongoing academic debates about the relationship between film and history as well as wider debates about Hollywood and the film industry. All of this is explored with detailed reference to the films themselves and related to a set of wider concerns that Stone has sought to grapple with -the American Century, exceptionalism and the American Dream, global empire, government surveillance and corporate accountability. The book concludes with a perspective on Stone’s ‘brand’ as not just an auteur and commercially viable independent filmmaker but as an activist arguing for a very distinct kind of American exceptionalism that seeks a positive role for the US globally whilst eschewing military adventurism.

Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs

all of these films engage with history, they are also creative products designed to work as profitable entertainment commodities. They are to that extent part of the imaginative construct that is heritage. As such, historical accuracy is not the interest here, but rather the way that films from the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries present the British monarchy to contemporary global audiences, the way they

in The British monarchy on screen

The Tudors (2007–10) is a prime example of a relatively new type of post-national and post-historical television series that has become an established global alternative to BBC costume drama. Drawing on international rather than specifically British ideals of nationhood, it often runs counter to received history 1 while the use of computer-generated imagery (CGI) gives

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Royal weddings and the media promotion of British fashion

’ projected on global media platforms. What comes first? Is an event of intrinsic significance captured on film, or does it become a fashion moment by being filmed? Doane’s writing on cinematic time provides a useful approach by reviewing early cinema and its ability to fix moments of time. 12 The actuality films of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century were often recordings of everyday life, of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia

nations. Gratified to be amongst the chosen and alert to possibilities for their own touristic exposure, the sites on the route furnished an exotic global backdrop for royal dramaturgy. Venues and events were prepared for a year in advance. In Suva the ‘enterprising officer of the public works Department’ who cheaply and cunningly disguised unsightly damage from a recent cyclone and drought was awarded

in The British monarchy on screen
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence

83 5 Dancing the ruptured body: One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence I move the reader–​spectator to view the performance of a protest movement that calls on us to end violence against women through the power of dance. One Billion Rising, initiated by feminist author and activist Eve Ensler, calls for a global uprising on Valentine’s Day, utilising dance to protest against gendered violence. The impact of the movement has been far-​reaching and its scope ambitious. The site of the movement is the moving body upon which gendered violence is inscribed

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)

– easy contrasts being between narrative cinema and the fragmentary action and spectacular intensity of music videos or the idiosyncratic variability of interactive web experiences. In technological, textual and structural terms, these different media compete for preeminence, for literal and symbolic capital, in an increasingly global context. This chapter focuses on the agonistic dimension of

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)

to smartphones, but to the corporatisation of the military itself.14 Indeed, the Edward Snowden story that Stone was drawn to by 2014, explicitly revealed the extent to which the use of commercial contractors had become integral to the emergence of a ‘global security state’.15 The USA had become, in Stone’s words, a ‘corporate oligarchy’, and war was now its stratagem of choice.16 With its emphasis on the maintenance of empire, the Untold History series helped lay the groundwork for Stone’s critique of the global security apparatus, and this in turn provided a

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The dancer of the future dancing radical hope

, regardless of what she said or wore; through Martha Graham, whose psyche was divided between herself and her chorus, and in turn allowed uninvited audience members to perform their equality, the argument danced equality, solidarity and intervention. It then proceeded to the long line of gumboot dancers, who released in a language they were not entitled to speak, and in this way created a space for themselves, a world in which they were to make sense before it was even built. The argument moves to global responses to Eve Ensler’s call for the utilisation of dance against

in Dance and politics