Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 28 items for :

  • globalization x
  • Manchester Film Studies x
Clear All
Art, authorship and activism

This book charts and analyses the work of Oliver Stone – arguably one of the foremost political filmmakers in Hollywood during the last thirty years. Drawing on previously unseen production files from Oliver Stone’s personal archives and hours of interviews both with Stone and a range of present and former associates within the industry, the book employs a thematic structure to explore Stone’s life and work in terms of war, politics, money, love and corporations. This allows the authors both to provide a synthesis of earlier and later film work as well as locate that work within Stone’s developing critique of government. The book explores the development of aesthetic changes in Stone’s filmmaking and locates those changes within ongoing academic debates about the relationship between film and history as well as wider debates about Hollywood and the film industry. All of this is explored with detailed reference to the films themselves and related to a set of wider concerns that Stone has sought to grapple with -the American Century, exceptionalism and the American Dream, global empire, government surveillance and corporate accountability. The book concludes with a perspective on Stone’s ‘brand’ as not just an auteur and commercially viable independent filmmaker but as an activist arguing for a very distinct kind of American exceptionalism that seeks a positive role for the US globally whilst eschewing military adventurism.

Open Access (free)

– easy contrasts being between narrative cinema and the fragmentary action and spectacular intensity of music videos or the idiosyncratic variability of interactive web experiences. In technological, textual and structural terms, these different media compete for preeminence, for literal and symbolic capital, in an increasingly global context. This chapter focuses on the agonistic dimension of

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)

to smartphones, but to the corporatisation of the military itself.14 Indeed, the Edward Snowden story that Stone was drawn to by 2014, explicitly revealed the extent to which the use of commercial contractors had become integral to the emergence of a ‘global security state’.15 The USA had become, in Stone’s words, a ‘corporate oligarchy’, and war was now its stratagem of choice.16 With its emphasis on the maintenance of empire, the Untold History series helped lay the groundwork for Stone’s critique of the global security apparatus, and this in turn provided a

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)

is embracing a personal worldview: a rebuttal of neo-​conservative hegemony, a challenge to government authority, a calling to account of the ‘news-​for-​profit’ media, a wider rallying point for Left-​leaning disaffection, and the articulation of a variant of the American Dream that is offered as a counter to the myth of global hegemony. As James Welsh and Donald Whaley have noted, the movement from the supposed macho right-​winger who wrote Conan the Barbarian, to leftist crusader with Salvador, to establishment chronicler in World Trade Center has not revolved

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America

Writing in 1991, Michael Kammen stated, ‘For more than a decade now, the connection between collective memory and national identity has been a matter of intense and widespread interest’. 1 Kammen’s examples, ranging from Brazil to several Eastern and Western European countries, make it clear that he sees this interest as a global phenomenon, but the connection between

in Memory and popular film

. Originally the plan for a 1951 festival derived from the centenary of the Great Exhibition of 1851 which showcased the achievements of newly industrialised Victorian society and its global empire. Gerald Barry, editor of the left-wing News Chronicle , had championed the idea in 1945. The government decided to set up the Ramsden Committee to investigate the idea of a ‘Universal International Exhibition

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)

most often. Amid this ‘swirling confusion’ and ‘surreal experience’, as Lawrence Lichty and Raymond Carroll would have it, Stone tried to fashion a broader critique of US power and institutional breakdown.25 The real violence, he wanted to say, was arranged by government and exacted upon a series of nation states whose crime had been to show ideological tendencies incompatible with American global, hegemonic aims. The Academy, at least, was sure that he had hit the mark, and recognised his efforts with the Oscar for Best Director. What was lost in the hyperbole and

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film

with the (global) media sphere, which has led to various assumptions and theories of amnesia. However, notions of historical and memorial blockage present a limited view of modern memory practice. Crucially, they fail to address the means and possibilities for articulating the past through established and developing forms of technological mediation. While this will be addressed specifically in part three of Memory and popular film , emphasis

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood

‘reconstructed the massive score using original research by musicologist David Kershaw’. 8 However, these are all safe, stellar attractions from the global film canon which have in effect already been voted as worthy of preservation by international film culture. Hollywood titles are often revived through the foregrounding of a sense of technological presence. Focusing on the soundtrack, for example, easily

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture

within the dominant code, the ‘negotiated code or position’ which draws on both hegemonic and oppositional elements and tends to focus on situational or local meanings, and the ‘oppositional code’ in which the viewer decodes the message in an oppositional or ‘globally contrary’ way, rejecting the cultural/political framework in which the message was encoded, in favor of an

in Memory and popular film