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Guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48
Susan Armstrong-Reid

nurses, such as Hughes and Stanley, to meet the Chinese population’s humanitarian needs was mediated by the deepening civil war nested in the onset of the Cold War. Even as the Chinese civil war intensified, the contested state authority and power over humanitarian aid began to be relocated upwards to new liberal Western international organisations and transnational actors, and sideways to social movements 226 Two China ‘gadabouts’ and subgroups. Making humanitarian negotiations central to global nursing-history inquiry illuminates the current challenges of

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
History, time and temporality in development discourse
Uma Kothari

thinking around globalization and security. This bounded classification not only obscures the colonial genealogy of development but also undermines attempts to demonstrate historical continuities and divergences in the theory, practice and policies of development. This delimited and linear history constructed and continuously represented emerges, in part, out of a perceived necessity to distance development, which is understood as inherently ‘good’, humanitarian and progressive, from the contemporary negativity surrounding Britain’s imperial history and a colonial

in History, historians and development policy
Barbra Mann Wall

. Doing research on humanitarian relief work is problematic in many ways. Colonial leaders wrote many of the documents of African 193 Barbra Mann Wall history and they are full of cultural biases.28 Mission documents are also plentiful, although much of the discourse was directed at an audience back home either to obtain donations or to report to the sisters’ motherhouses. A major problem is the absence of voices of those excluded from power. Even though Nigerians were in the majority in their country, many lacked the means to document their personal experiences, and

in Colonial caring
Legality and legitimacy
Dominic McGoldrick

contested. This goes to the heart of issues of legality and legitimacy for international trials. For much of its history ‘international criminal law’, if it has existed at all, has been rudimentary, indeterminate, and ineffectual.3 It existed in the nether regions of international humanitarian law, which existed in the nether regions of public international law. A system of ‘international criminal justice’ might be thought to require some consensus on the existence and values of the ‘international community’. The existence of such a community in this sense and its values

in Domestic and international trials, 1700–2000
Open Access (free)
Rima D. Apple

reflected that of nursing around the globe throughout the twentieth century. However, their often iconic status and position made them critical components of the imperial project. The authors in this volume have located and mined crucial source material, including diaries, letters, professional journals, government reports, interviews and photographs and films, to present nuanced histories that disclose the complexities and uncertainties of colonial and post-colonial nursing and, at the same time, illuminate the imperial project and its aftermath. Some of the nurses who

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

In 1841, Herman Merivale, professor of political economy at Oxford University and soon to be appointed under-secretary of state for the colonies, made the following remarks about the nature of colonisation: The history of the European settlements in America, Africa, and Australia, presents everywhere the same general features – a

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Better ‘the Hottentot at the hustings’ than ‘the Hottentot in the wilds with his gun on his shoulder’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

legal equality of 1842 had paved the way for potential political equality, and for a Constitution which did not so much as mention colour and knew no “Colour Bar”’ (p. 263). See also Marais, Cape Coloured People , chapter 5 , on the humanitarian ‘Cape tradition’. On Macmillan and the South African liberal history tradition, see H. Macmillan and S

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

Introduction: contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins Nursing history has until recently been an insular analysis whose central theme was most often professionalisation within national borders, and although a more international perspective has been emerging over the past five to ten years there is still a big gap in its literature when examining the role nurses and nursing played in a country’s colonial and post-colonial past and the impact that experience of this particular form of nursing had on the wider development of

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
One or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

of north-eastern NSW. 3 But what was barely addressed, in the swift passage of these colonies from Crown colonies to near-self-governing democratic societies, was the place of Indigenous peoples in the political process. British humanitarians put considerable pressure on the Colonial Office through the later 1830s and the 1840s to protect the Indigenous peoples on the

in Equal subjects, unequal rights