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Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Towards a contemporary aesthetic
Jonathan Dollimore

2 Jonathan Dollimore Art in time of war: towards a contemporary aesthetic In times of war In September 1914 an agonised Hermann Hesse writes of how war is destroying the foundations of Europe’s precious cultural heritage, and thereby the future of civilisation itself. Hesse stands proudly for what he calls a ‘supranational’ tradition of human culture, intrinsic to which are ideals essentially humanitarian: an ‘international world of thought, of inner freedom, of intellectual conscience’ and a belief in ‘an artistic beauty cutting across national boundaries’.1

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

or aesthetic anti-war feeling – reactions that, as we will see, were as valid and real as any of a religious or political nature. I felt it was time to set the record straight. Very occasionally, this humanistic anti-war feeling has been noted in ‘official’ studies. In his Pacifism in Britain 1914–1945: The Defining of a Faith, the historian Martin Ceadel singles out what he terms ‘humanitarian pacifism’ as a valid form of anti-war feeling, stating that it is ‘no less a dogma’ than religious or political pacifism. However, in Ceadel’s book, humanitarian pacifism is

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Janet Beer and Bridget Bennett

founded on and generating both accord and contention. The connection between the former colony and colonial power is one that has always been complex and it is not our intention here to track its history. The aim of this collection of essays is, rather, to consider a series of cultural and literary relationships that took place across the Atlantic (and often despite it). These suggest that, in cultural terms at least, the relationship between Britain and the United States has been a particularly productive one, whether in antagonism or amity. The eleven essays in this

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

to the destructive ‘fiery conviction’ of the war years. In addition, Russell’s concerns were echoed, often independently, by other individuals, whether celebrated or obscure. The ground was being laid for the organised voice of historian Martin Ceadel’s ‘humanitarian pacifism’ of the 1920s and 1930s.16 It is clear that aesthetic and 228 A war of individuals humanistic anti-war feeling was not simply an inter-war ‘innovation’, but existed much earlier during the actual conflict and emanated from differing sources on an individual basis in its expression. The

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s
Ingrid Ryberg

’ (1984) [‘Investigation about the situation of homosexuals in society’], would put homosexuality on the official political agenda as a legitimate social and civil rights issue in Sweden, paving the way for cohabitation, anti-​ discrimination, parental and marital rights during the following decades. The two rare lesbian films examined in this chapter, largely forgotten and overlooked in Swedish film history as well as in feminist and queer historiography, anticipate these crucial shifts in the official medical, legal and social understanding of homosexuality in Sweden

in The power of vulnerability
Translatina world-making in The Salt Mines and Wildness
Laura Horak

. (1996). Reel to Real: Race, Sex, and Class at the Movies. New York: Routledge. Jelača, D. (2016). ‘Gendered visions in As If I Am Not There and in The Land of Blood and Honey: Female precarity, the humanitarian gaze and the politics of situated knowledge’, Jump Cut, 57. Juhasz, A. (1999). ‘They said we were trying to show reality –​all I want to show is my video: The politics of the realist feminist documentary’, in J. Gaines and M. Renov (eds), Collecting Visible Evidence. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp. 190–​215. Keegan, C. M. (2016). ‘History

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Syrian displacement and care in contemporary Beirut
Ella Parry- Davies

infrastructures of care that seek to work against this precarity. I use the term ‘infrastructure’ after AbdouMaliq Simone, whose attention to ‘people as infrastructure’ denotes intersubjective and complex ‘combinations of objects, spaces, persons, and practices, […] providing for and reproducing life in the city’ ( 2004 : 408). I trace a disciplinary history in which migration has been celebrated as a metaphor for transgression and examine the ways in which apprehending the images instead through an ‘aesthetics of care’ (Thompson, 2015 ) might defamiliarise these tropes. A

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Bronwen Price

William Rawley, Bacon’s secretary and editor, which suggests that Bacon’s original intention was ‘to have composed a frame of Laws, or the best state or mould of a commonwealth’,6 and that, as Rawley notes at the end, ‘The rest was not perfected’ (488). However, some critics consider the New Atlantis’s apparent fragmentariness to be part of its overall design:7 its identity lies between part and whole. Significantly in this regard, Bacon’s fable is appended to the much larger work of natural history, Sylva Sylvarum, which comprises a compendium of hundreds of

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

desire for Valentine. But desire he now almost knows it is. His conscious control of himself is being challenged by his presence at the front and the fragmenting effects of that existence. It is also being challenged by a defensive and grudging acknowledgement of the psychological developments of the time (it is undoubtedly significant here that his wife, Sylvia, pinned her ‘faith’ to Freud (p. 37)); he is indirectly rethinking his history, and his psychological history at that.16 Learning, visibly, he is being pushed to give tentative, linguistic life to concepts that

in Fragmenting modernism