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The Queen in Australia

in the Pacific suggest that the term better describes a historical period of international political enthusiasm, rather than any standard political process. In Australia and Aotearoa-New Zealand, decolonisation continues into present-day struggles over Indigenous land rights and treaty obligations for example, while international enthusiasm has passed over secessionist struggles in West Papua in

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport

Britain. 27 Yet they also signal its declining relevance in an increasingly multicultural society with the narrow focus on the ‘Anglo’ white male dissipating in the films of the 1990s and beyond. Felicity Collins and Therese Davis demonstrate the rupture that the Mabo decision of 1992 (a High Court decision that allowed Indigenous Australians to claim their land rights) brought to Australian cinema, 28 introducing a

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)

presenting their tributes, and the occasional Indigenous dancer – are played by Australians in a striking performance of imaginary unity. Fifty-six years later, both social hierarchy and imperial loyalty were confirmed in the highly successful dramatisation of Elizabeth’s father, the soon-to-be George VI, and his treatment by Australian actor-turned-speech therapist Lionel Logue. The King’s Speech (2010) takes the imperial story

in The British monarchy on screen
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle

ENTHUSIASM, the vast audience rising EN MASSE, cheering incessantly until the picture was reproduced. 52 As the screenings continued in Melbourne, ‘the waving arm of Sir George Turner’, the Australian Prime Minister, was reported to be ‘loudly applauded every evening’. 53 In Canada, where there were also no doubt mixed responses

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Baker and Berman, and Tempean Films

‘collection of well-worn jokes stitched together to make a plot’. 7 These were not the sort of films that would account for Tempean’s prolific output in the 1950s. In 1950 they began to turn out the kind of efficient crime thrillers that would be their staple for most of the decade. The first five are wholly indigenous in flavour, with British stars, generally of the second rank, supported by sturdy

in British cinema of the 1950s