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Caribbean and in Britain. At the intellectual level, I have become preoccupied by a number of issues, explored here, that colonial and postcolonial studies have ignored or find difficulty in including in their grander analyses. A commonplace of postcolonial studies is the supposed subversiveness of the colonial/postcolonial subject, through the tropes of mimicry, cultural hybridity, and writing or speaking

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’

awareness of our own unconditioned mental action in ‘intellectual intuition’, or whether the idea of grasping the absolute I is merely regulative, generated by the need of practical reason to go Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’ 103 beyond the world of the understanding. Fichte also tends to regard nature merely as an undeveloped aspect of the highest principle, while at the same time suggesting that what drives the highest principle is itself not available to discursive philosophy. He consequently suggests that the conscious I has an unconscious basis, and it is this

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis

notion of ‘intellectual intuition’ in the attempt to grasp the decisive principle, but he characterises it in a different way from Kant, seeing it as ‘that through which I know something because I do it’ (Fichte 1971 I p. 463). Intellectual intuition involves both the act of thinking and the consciousness of that act: ‘the consciousness of my thinking is not something which is just coincidental to my thinking, something which is added to it afterwards and thus linked to it, rather it is inseparable from it’ (1971 I p. 527) – otherwise it is not clear what makes my

in Aesthetics and subjectivity

region’s culture. Frontier analysis, on the other hand, falls within the perspective that searches for common ground. One of the uses of frontier analysis is, for example, in overcoming the intellectual impasse that has developed in the interdisciplinary field of ‘island studies’. Lisa Fletcher has identified how this field has been undermined by an untheorised distinction between the relative values of

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
The St Vincent and the Grenadines context

(embodying the ‘wild’: nature, chaos and that which needed to be tamed); the planters’ and intellectuals’ fear of the land returning to bush; and, in contrast, a growing lyricism in response to the beauty of the environment in its wild state. At a practical level, the colonial authorities in St Vincent were anxious to improve the society and protect it from contamination by wild

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

have helped theorists from the region and outside explain its geopolitical position(s) under state socialism and postsocialism. ‘The Balkans’ in global racial formations Positing a ‘black Adriatic’ from Gilroy's ‘black Atlantic’, a device through which I encouraged listeners in Nottingham and Budapest to trace such connections in their own work at workshops in 2015–16, is to ask: what questions would south-east studies have to pose in determining what an equivalent of Gilroy's transnational approach to black intellectual

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

philosophers took Voltaire’s side in the debate over Lisbon,12 and at a time when the bulk of the intellectuals sided with Hume’s agnostic view that ‘by the light of reason it seems difficult to prove the immortality of the soul’ (Hume 1985: 591), Rousseau went against the common trend. While having declared that he would give reasons for his views, Rousseau did not care much for proofs, nor did he succumb to doubt and despair: ‘doubt is too violent a feeling. As my reason is shaken, my creed cannot bear the tension and decides against reason’ (IV: 1070). Such statements of

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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An epilogue

imaginary but palpable distended and aggrandizing West/Europe as modernity – for all those awaiting its second coming in prior places, anachronistic spaces, lagging in time. In artistic, intellectual, and aesthetic arenas, modernism(s) in South Asia have variously, often critically, engaged with these projections and presuppositions: but they have also been unable to easily escape

in Subjects of modernity
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progress; rather they avail themselves for discussions with posterity – a discussion that will never be concluded. To follow this approach is likely to attract criticism. The bulk of British writers on the subject of the history of ideas follow a contextual approach (Skinner 1969). Quintin Skinner – the foremost of the contexutalists – has rejected the idea that the classics may have political relevance beyond their own time. He has gone so far as saying that it ‘must be a mistake even to try to write intellectual biographies concentrating on the works of a given writer

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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In the beginning was song

effects, which he refers to as the ‘voice of nature’ (V: 350). As in society in general, music had followed a process of both degradation and progress; it had been given Chap006.p65 113 11/09/03, 13:36 114 The political philosophy of Rousseau articulation, substance and an intellectual basis. For Rousseau the error of Rameau and his followers was to think that the science of harmony – a branch of physics – could elucidate musical phenomena. In fact, music could not be reduced to a set of vibrations. The underlying sense of music was moral and contingent on the

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau