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Mark Jackson

Introduction In 1965, the Canadian-born psychoanalyst and social scientist Elliott Jaques introduced a term – the midlife crisis – that continues to structure Western experiences and expressions of love and loss in middle age. Jaques's early work, carried out at the Tavistock Institute of Human Relations during the 1940s and 1950s, had focused primarily on the ways in which social systems operated as forms of ‘defense against persecutory and depressive anxiety’ among their members, as well as a mechanism for protecting the

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris
Manon Mathias

, there has never been religious intolerance, martyrs, torturers, war, or murder, and the Martians live in peace, liberated from all material needs and constantly engaged in intellectual activity. Uranie combines fiction (utopia, fantasy, love story), popular astronomy, religion, and psychic research, fulfilling the generic diversity and multiplicity which Sipe insists characterises the utopian afterlife. 85 In its exploration of space, the text calls to mind the writings of

in Progress and pathology
Hysterical tetanus in the Victorian South Pacific
Daniel Simpson

: 19th August. This afternoon I witnessed the saddest scene possible we had been greatly alarmed all day about the state of the Com at 5pm he sent for all the officers into his sleeping cabin he spoke to us all generally at first telling us the great comfort he had in dying was the love of God and exhorting us to love him more then he said goodbye & spoke a few kind words to each of us kissing us all round every one in tears. If Goodenough had not resigned himself to his death

in Progress and pathology
The Fowlers and modern brain disorder
Kristine Swenson

of audience members and taking plaster casts of the prominent or interesting. Sometimes performing blindfolded or giving ‘double-test’ examinations, the theatrical brothers thrived in front of local audiences, pronouncing noted painters as possessing ‘small Color’ or well-loved clergymen as having ‘an utter absence of Conscientiousness’. 29 The brothers defended ‘the science’ and their readings, even when local audiences disagreed with them, revelling especially when some secret life or bad behaviour was revealed to

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

(‘coming of age’) between North America and Samoa. Mead writes that ‘neither race nor common humanity can be held responsible for many of the forms which even such basic emotions as love and fear and anger take under different social conditions’. But straight from this disavowal of common humanity she deploys something universal, writing of ‘babies who have as yet no civilization to shape their malleable humanity’. 10 In fact, a fuller quotation bears analysis

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Health as moral economy in the long nineteenth century
Christopher Hamlin

raising pheasant chicks. Not so Ivy Bolton, miner's widow, parish nurse, and finally nurse-companion to Clifford, a role in which she is both above and of Tevershall. Her story is complicated. Were Sophocles in charge, it might be one of vengeful karma. Ted, the husband she loved, had died in an explosion in Tevershall pit (before Clifford inherited). On the grounds of his independence – he stood while others crouched – compensation had been minimal (122–3). Ted had hated that life; he could not escape it even in sex with a caring partner seeking to

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

. 53 Woman in Town (Radio London, 1984). 54 L. Vines and M. Oakey, The Heart that Has Truly Loved: The Memoires of Lorraine Vines , 2nd edition ([S. I.]: Kathi Wyldeck, 2009), p. 280. 55 L. Mitchell, Simple Relaxation: The

in Balancing the self
Martin D. Moore

. Tomlinson, The Politics of Decline: Understanding Post-War Britain (Harlow: Pearson, 2001); B. Harrison, Seeking a Role: The United Kingdom, 1951–1970 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009). 71 J. Bourke, ‘Love and limblessness: male heterosexuality, disability, and the Great War’, Journal of War and Culture Studies , 9:1 (2016), 3–19. The idea of ‘mastering’ one's body was also prominent in efforts to address a range of conditions

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

me personally, he was not young, but had a compassion for his patients, and staff. I would never have dared to speak to Him [sic], because to look at a Doctor above his feet was unheard of familiarity. All he said to me was: ‘How are you settling down nurse? Are you happy in Hospital training?’ I dared to look him straight in the eye, simply saying ‘Oh yes Sir. I love the work.’ He had scarcely left the ward, before Sister called me to her table, in the centre of the ward, ‘How dare you make yourself obvious to the Surgeon – or Doctor? Disgusting behaviour and must

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Liesbeth Hesselink

, without regard to rank or class, if the practice of Christian virtues is its principal driving force.56 Apparently, these noble mainsprings were reserved for women:  ‘Indeed, there is well-nigh no finer vocation imaginable for woman, our superior in love and devotion, than to devote her strengths to subservient love, which expresses itself in nursing the sick.’57 The later governor-general A.  W.  F. Idenburg exulted in a 155 Liesbeth Hesselink report of his visit to the Petronella missionary hospital, where he had made the acquaintance of the two European nurses

in Colonial caring