Search results

Open Access (free)
The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris

, there has never been religious intolerance, martyrs, torturers, war, or murder, and the Martians live in peace, liberated from all material needs and constantly engaged in intellectual activity. Uranie combines fiction (utopia, fantasy, love story), popular astronomy, religion, and psychic research, fulfilling the generic diversity and multiplicity which Sipe insists characterises the utopian afterlife. 85 In its exploration of space, the text calls to mind the writings of

in Progress and pathology
Hysterical tetanus in the Victorian South Pacific

: 19th August. This afternoon I witnessed the saddest scene possible we had been greatly alarmed all day about the state of the Com at 5pm he sent for all the officers into his sleeping cabin he spoke to us all generally at first telling us the great comfort he had in dying was the love of God and exhorting us to love him more then he said goodbye & spoke a few kind words to each of us kissing us all round every one in tears. If Goodenough had not resigned himself to his death

in Progress and pathology
The Fowlers and modern brain disorder

of audience members and taking plaster casts of the prominent or interesting. Sometimes performing blindfolded or giving ‘double-test’ examinations, the theatrical brothers thrived in front of local audiences, pronouncing noted painters as possessing ‘small Color’ or well-loved clergymen as having ‘an utter absence of Conscientiousness’. 29 The brothers defended ‘the science’ and their readings, even when local audiences disagreed with them, revelling especially when some secret life or bad behaviour was revealed to

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Health as moral economy in the long nineteenth century

raising pheasant chicks. Not so Ivy Bolton, miner's widow, parish nurse, and finally nurse-companion to Clifford, a role in which she is both above and of Tevershall. Her story is complicated. Were Sophocles in charge, it might be one of vengeful karma. Ted, the husband she loved, had died in an explosion in Tevershall pit (before Clifford inherited). On the grounds of his independence – he stood while others crouched – compensation had been minimal (122–3). Ted had hated that life; he could not escape it even in sex with a caring partner seeking to

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)

me personally, he was not young, but had a compassion for his patients, and staff. I would never have dared to speak to Him [sic], because to look at a Doctor above his feet was unheard of familiarity. All he said to me was: ‘How are you settling down nurse? Are you happy in Hospital training?’ I dared to look him straight in the eye, simply saying ‘Oh yes Sir. I love the work.’ He had scarcely left the ward, before Sister called me to her table, in the centre of the ward, ‘How dare you make yourself obvious to the Surgeon – or Doctor? Disgusting behaviour and must

in Nurse Writers of the Great War

, without regard to rank or class, if the practice of Christian virtues is its principal driving force.56 Apparently, these noble mainsprings were reserved for women:  ‘Indeed, there is well-nigh no finer vocation imaginable for woman, our superior in love and devotion, than to devote her strengths to subservient love, which expresses itself in nursing the sick.’57 The later governor-general A.  W.  F. Idenburg exulted in a 155 Liesbeth Hesselink report of his visit to the Petronella missionary hospital, where he had made the acquaintance of the two European nurses

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)

State: A History of Public Health from Ancient to Modern Times (London: Routledge, 1999). 5 Roberta Bivins, ‘ “The people have no more love left for the Commonwealth”: Media, migration and identity in the 1961–62 British smallpox outbreak’, Immigrants & Minorities , 25:3 (2007), 263–89; Roberta Bivins, Contagious Communities: Medicine, Migration, and the NHS in Post-War Britain (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015). 6 Bivins, ‘ “The people have no more love left” ’ and Bivins, Contagious Communities

in Vaccinating Britain
Guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48

share the burden of suffering of another, to help restore his sense of self-respect and integrity and to restore his faith in love and good-will through a practical demonstration of human sympathy and brotherhood. Convinced of the error of the way of violence, Friends seek to make love the basis of their relationships with others.1 Statement of the Peace Testimony in the Service Contract for the Society of Friends Ambulance Unit (FAU) Introduction In 1946 British surgical nurse Elizabeth Hughes and American public-health nurse Margaret Stanley eagerly anticipated

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)

the tent full of ‘men, reeking with blood, [which] was where I was needed’.3 In a letter to her mother in July 1943, Sister Agnes Morgan wrote, ‘Most of my love seems to be given to these men, what there is left is for you.’4 Emma Newland’s study of the civilian-­made-­soldier highlights the depersonalisation of the process that turned ordinary men into the machines of war.5 Negotiating nursing establishes the work of nursing sisters in re-­humanising these men, to support their recovery from injury and illness and remind them of why they were fighting. This is the

in Negotiating nursing

focused romantic love for a particular object: I visualized myself driving an ambulance along the battle lines, aiding and comforting the wounded, or kneeling beside dying men in shell-torn No Man’s Land. Or better still, gliding silently among hospital cots, placing a cool hand on fevered brows, lifting bound heads to moisten pain-parched lips with water … Perhaps Ted, whom I  was then regarding with some favour, would be brought back to the hospital – wounded. Oh, very slightly 176 American young women at war wounded, of course. Gassed a bit perhaps. Or with a

in Nurse Writers of the Great War